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Wine Tastings at the Toledo Zoo

Wine-down from your day with a wine tasting on the wild side at the Toledo Zoo!

Enjoy our dynamic exhibits and animals while sipping wines from around the globe. Make your reservations now for the next installment of the Zoo’s 2017 wine tasting series on Friday, May 19, from 7 – 9 p.m. in The Lodge at the Toledo Zoo.

Additional dates in the 2017 Wine Tasting Series: Friday, June 23- Malawi Event Center (formerly Nairobi Pavilion)

Each event also includes professionally paired hors d’oeuvres and live music. The Zoo’s Wine Tasting Series not only makes for great date nights, but also for unique after-hours office gatherings and guys’ or girls’ nights out!

Reserve your space by visiting toledozoo.org/wine or calling 419-385-5721, ext. 6001. Tickets must be purchased in advance and reservations are required. Tickets start at $45 for Zoo members and $50 for non-members. Guests must be 21 or over with valid ID to attend.

 

 

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What’s Blooming at the Toledo Zoo

Rock Cress is a perfect first plant for the novice gardener, as it is cold hardy, drought tolerant, easy to maintain and, of course, pretty. This semi-evergreen perennial plant which produces brightly colored flowers in spring is suitable for a ground cover, rock garden or dangling down a wall or hill side.

Check out this perfect perennial in the landscape of the Arctic Encounter.

 

 

 

 

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Toledo Zoo Party for the Planet

Join the Toledo Zoo in celebrating Mother Earth and exemplifying our mission of inspiring others to join us in caring for animals and conserving the natural world during Party for the Planet, supported by MetroPCS and Toledo Waterways Initiative along with media sponsor Buckeye Broadband, on Saturday, April 22.

Drop off your recyclable goods – including hard-to-recycle items– between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. in the Zoo’s Anthony Wayne Trail parking lot. Admission/parking charges do not apply to this special recycling project, which is made possible through partnerships with: Goodwill, AIM Ecycling, LLC., GoGreen Ohio, KTLCB/Lucas County Waste Management, Gateway Recycling and Waste Reduction, Inc., and TerraCycle.

As well as dropping off your recyclables, the Zoo is the perfect place to spend a great green day with your family! Get tips on how to be more ecofriendly through displays from local “green” organizations, enjoy earth-friendly activities in the award-winning Nature’s Neighborhood and witness animal feeding demonstrations all across the Zoo. These demonstrations are more than just fun to watch; they also serve to remind us that animals all across the world are relying on humans to take care of the land, water and air we all call home. Additionally, six local schools will have miniature gardens with recycled materials incorporated into their designs on display in the Great Hall of the Museum of Science both Saturday, April 22 and Sunday, April 23. All of the green activities are included free with Zoo admission.

For more information and a full list of recyclable items, please visit www.toledozoo.org/party-for-the-planet.

 

 

 

 

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Toledo Zoo’s Reticulated Python Video

Conservation Clip

Reticulated pythons (Broghammerus reticulatus) grow to be the longest snakes in the world at 15-20 feet. Reticulatus means “net-like” in Latin and refers to the snakes intricate color pattern. These snakes are common in rainforests, woodlands and grass lands, typically near a water source, throughout southeast Asia and nearby islands. These ambush predators feed on a variety of small mammals and birds by constricting their prey. As with all pythons, retics as they are affectionately known, are nonvenomous and not considered a threat to humans. With their sheer size, adult pythons have extremely few natural predators. Plan your visit to the Toledo Zoo to meet our big girl!


Check out this video of our herpetology staff weighing and measuring our resident female Reticulated Python!


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60XdK1q0rnw&w=560&h=315]


  • To watch more exciting, educational videos from your Toledo Zoo, please subscribe to our YouTube channel or like us on Facebook.
  • You can also adopt” our reticulated python!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Toledo Zoo’s Great White Bears

Polar Bears

Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are listed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List as a vulnerable species and as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act due to loss of Arctic sea ice from climate change. Current IUCN estimates place the population status at approximately 26,000 bears in the wild. In recent years, some of the 19 known sub-populations of polar bears have seen decreasing numbers due to warming Arctic temperatures which causes a reduction in sea ice, the main location for polar bears to hunt seals, breed and construct dens. As the sea ice melts, polar bears are forced to walk or swim farther to reach their prey (seals). Although powerful short-distance swimmers, polar bears cannot swim for days or weeks on end. Mature bears starve to death and younger cubs drown. Additionally, the reduction in sea ice also causes polar bears to spend more time on land which has put them in greater contact and conflict with humans.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Oo7RObvJCs]


So what can we do to help the great white bear?


We can all work at reducing our individual carbon footprint. The term “carbon footprint” refers to how much carbon dioxide (CO₂) each person, group or company’s daily activities put into the Earth’s atmosphere. Contributing negative factors, include electricity usage, burning of coal and oil, length of commute to school or work and consumption of good and services produced overseas. Positive factors include, energy efficient vehicles and appliances, recycling and conservation efforts and even the number of trees and plants in your yard. Carbon footprints are important because CO₂ is a greenhouse gas, meaning it traps heat in the Earth’s atmosphere. This heat, in turn, is melting sea ice and warming air and water temperatures.

Your Zoo is also doing its part by participating in the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP) for polar bears. This cooperative breeding program helps to ensure a healthy, genetically diverse and lasting captive insurance population of polar bears. Over the last ten years there have been approximately 10 successful polar bear cub births in the U.S., with the majority happening at the Toledo Zoo. In fact, the Zoo’s own assistant director of animal programs, Dr. Randi Meyerson, is the polar bear SSP coordinator and advisor to the world-renowned polar bear conservation organization, Polar Bear International (PBI). PBI has also designated the Toledo Zoo as an Arctic Ambassador Center. Zoos designated as Arctic Ambassador Centers strive for bear-friendly exhibits with extensive enrichment activities to stimulate the bears to be active and content. Arctic Ambassador Centers also support PBI research projects, educating the public about climate change and providing leadership for greenhouse gas reductions. Come visit Hope and her mom, Crystal, in the Arctic Encounter exhibit that the Toledo Zoo!


  • To watch more exciting, educational videos from your Toledo Zoo, please subscribe to our YouTube channel or like us on Facebook.
  • You can also adopt” one of the Zoo’s magnificent polar bears!

 

 

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