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writing

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

If you’re looking for inspiration or simply tips on writing, why not learn from experienced and successful writers like Stephen King and Walter Dean Myers, after all they know their stuff! How did they become bestselling authors? What’s their secret to success?

Writers on Writing – Books

How to be a writer: conversations with writers about writing by David Quantick
On Writing: a memoir of the craft by Stephen King
Zen in the art of writing by Ray Bradbury
On Writing by Charles Bukowski
Letters to a Young Writer by Colum McCann
Just Write: Here's How by Walter Dean Myers
The Accidental Life - An Editor's Notes on Writing and Writers by Terry McDonell
Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living edited by Manjula Martin
The New York Times Footsteps : from Ferrante's Naples to Hammett's San Francisco, literary pilgrimages around the world
The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art of Storytelling by Charles Johnson
The writer who stayed / William Zinsser ; foreword by Robert Wilson
Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott
Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules of Writing
Reading like a writer : a guide for people who love books and for those who want to write them / Francine Prose
Pep Talks for Writers - 52 Insights and Actions to Boost Your Creative Mojo by Grant Faulkner
Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy: Advice and Confessions on Writing, Love, and Cannibals by Dinty W. Moore

Writers on Writing – Videos

How To Become A Published Author: Advice From Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Lee Child on Starting Writing After 40

Neil Gaiman on Writing

Alexander McCall-Smith

Isabel Wilkerson

Writing Tips from the Web

So, You Want to be a Writer? Essential Tips for Aspiring Novelists – The Guardian

33 Authors Gave Us Their Best Advice on Writing – Buzzfeed

World’s Best-Selling Author James Patterson On How To Write An Unputdownable Story – Fast Company

10 Powerful Secrets of Bestselling Authors – Write to Done

Practical Writing Tips from 65 Bestselling Authors – CreativINDIE

The 90 Top Secrets of Bestselling Authors – Writer’s Digest

Timeless Advice on Writing: The Collected Wisdom of Great Writers – Brain Pickings

Writers on Writing – NPR Playlist

Toledo Library Blog Posts on Writing

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

The Art of Storytelling: 5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

How to Write a Novel in a Month

Learn How to Publish a Book

Writer’s Block


Originally posted at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/writers-on-writing-tips-for-aspiring-authors by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S.

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Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Aspiring writers often have a lot of questions and may not know how to get the answers. Is my work any good? How can I promote my work? Are there any local outlets for writers? How do I get published? Joining a writing group can often help with questions like these and many more. Here are a few of the reasons and/or benefits of joining a writing group:

1. Encouragement

While it’s relatively easy to put off writing when you’re on your own, it’s less likely to happen if you’re meeting with a writing group regularly. After all, what will you share if you haven’t been working on something?

2. Guidance

There’s bound to be at least a few experienced writers in your group that can share their wisdom and provide support.

3. Inspiration

Reading and listening to a variety of work can lead to unique story ideas.

4. Feedback

A good writing group provides useful feedback designed to help you improve your craft.

5. Networking

Public performances, collaboration, and publishing opportunities are just a few of the added benefits.

If you would like to join a local writing group, we have a list for you:

Northwest Ohio Writing Groups

Frogtown Storytelling Guild

Description:
Are you a storyteller? Do you want to become a storyteller? Do you want to improve your storytelling skills? Do you just like to listen to storytellers? Then come to our monthly meetings to share a story or simply to listen. Open to budding storytellers, professional storytellers, natural-born storytellers, and shy storytellers (i.e., people who’d rather listen to storytellers than tell a story).To Join: Come to our monthly meetings to share a story or simply to listen. Open to budding storytellers, professional storytellers, natural-born storytellers, and shy storytellers (i.e., people who’d rather listen to storytellers than tell a story).

Meetings:
When:
2nd Saturday of the month, 9-11 a.m.
Where: Reynolds Corners Branch Library, 4833 Dorr Street Toledo, Ohio 43615

Contact: 
Facebook

Madd Poets Society

Description: 
The Madd Poets Society, Inc. was founded in December of 1999. MADD is an acronym and it best describes what this organization is all about: “Making A Direct Difference.”Contact: Fill out their contact form online.
Address: 3806 Driftwood, Toledo, OH 43614
Phone: (419) 509-6776
Founder: David Bush, Email
Facebook
Maumee Valley Romance Writers of America

Description:
Maumee Valley Romance Authors, Inc. is a local writing group of romance authors in the Toledo, Ohio area. They meet once a month to talk, share, and learn from one another about building a career writing romance novels. Their purpose is to advance the professional interests of career-focused romance writers through networking and advocacy, dissemination of information, professional education, publications, and other related activities, and to provide continuing support for writers within the romance publishing industry.

To Join
Any persons, eighteen or older, seriously persuing a writing career in romance or other fiction genres are welcome to join Maumee Valley Romance Authors, Inc. To join, please send an email to submit your membership application, or simply visit their next meeting for more details. Guests may attend two meetings before being required to join the group. Membership fees apply.

Meetings:

Where: Toledo-Lucas County Public Library – various branches
When: The last Saturday of the month, 10 a.m.-noon.
Check their website for meeting details as the times and locations may vary.

Contact: 
Email
New Works Writers Series

About: New Works Writers Series (New Works), is a not for profit 501c3 organization, founded December 1989, by Imelda Hunt, to provide an arena for showcasing local area writers, poets, musicians and actors.

Contact:
Fill out contact form online.
Address: 1548 Glenton Drive, Toledo, OH 43614
Phone: (419) 380-8464
Email
Northwest Ohio Writer’s Forum

Description: Our meetings are always free and open to the public. If you’ve ever thought about making a living as a writer or if you like to write just to see what’s going to happen, please drop in to our meetings. You’ll find a creative, supportive environment.

Meetings:
When:
September 16th, 2017 from 10am to 12 pm
Where: Reynolds Corners Branch Library, 4833 Dorr St, Toledo, OH 43615Contact: 
Fill out their contact form online.
Email
Facebook
Point Place Writer’s Group

Description: Join us for ideas and encouragement. It doesn’t matter if you’re an old hand, or just getting started. If you’d like, bring 10 copies of a short writing sample to share. New attendees are welcome. See you there!Meetings:
When: Second Saturday of the Month, 9:30 – 11:00 a.m.
Where: Point Place Library, 2727 117th Street, Toledo, Ohio 43611
Toledo Writer’s Workshop

Description:
 We are a group of eclectic writers who get together to share our work, brainstorm ideas, and offer input on each other’s work. Many of us are serious aspiring writers, but some simply write as a hobby. We have no requirements on what we review: fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and memoirs are a few examples.

Meetings:
When:
Tuesdays, 7-10 pm
Where: Bigby Coffee, 4031 N McCord Rd, Sylvania, OHContact:
Chris or Sarah
Facebook

Writing Group Resources – Books

Writing Alone, Writing Together: A Guide for Writers and Writing Groups by Judy Reeves
The Writing group book : creating and sustaining a successful writing group / edited by Lisa Rosenthal
Write Every Day: A Year of Daily Writing Prompts by J.M. Snyder
A Writer's Book Of Days: A Spirited Companion and Lively Muse for the Writing Life by Judy Reeves
Get Lit Rising: Words ignite. Claim your poem. Claim your life. / Diane Luby Lane and the Get Lit Players

Online Resources for Writers and Writing Groups

Want to Join a Writing Group? 8 Places to Look – The Write Life

20 Facebook Groups for Writers You Don’t Want to Miss – The Write Life

List of Writing Groups by State or Region – Writer’s Relief

The 4 Hidden Dangers of Writing Groups – Jane Friedman

Writing Groups 101 – Inked Voices

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/top-5-reasons-to-join-a-writing-group.

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How to Write a Novel in a Month

NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month, began in 1999 and takes place each November challenging writers to complete a novel in 30 days. The novel must include at least 50,000 words, which amounts to producing about 1,667 per day for a month.

You may be wondering – Is it even possible to write a novel in 30 days? According to NaNoWriMo hundreds of novels have been traditionally published including Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and Cinder by Marissa Meyer to name a few.

NaNoWriMo Mission Statement:

We believe in the transformational power of creativity. We provide the structure, community and encouragement to help people find their voices, achieve creative goals and build new worlds—on and off the page.

While November may be months away, we hope you’ll start thinking about writing now, find inspiration, read more about NaNoWriMo, check out some of our novel writing resources and hatch a plan to make your next novel a reality.

Novel Writing Resources

 

The Complete Handbook of Novel Writing: Everything You Need to Know to Create and Sell Your Work from the Editors of Writer's Digest (3rd edition)
Bring Your Fiction to Life: Crafting Three-Dimensional Stories with Depth and Complexity by Karen S. Wiesner
Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days by Denise Jaden
Write Your Novel in a Month: How to Complete a First Draft in 30 Days and What to do Next by Jeff Gerke
Write-A-Thon: Write Your Book in 26 Days (and live to tell about it) by Rochelle Melander
The Writer's Compass: From Story Map to Finished Draft in 7 Stages by Nancy Ellen Dodd
Troubleshooting Your Novel by Steven James
How to Write a Book Proposal: The Insider's Step-by-Step Guide to Proposals that Get You Published by Jody Rein and Michael Larsen
Novel & Short Story Writer's Market
Writing Your Novel From Start to Finish: A Guidebook for the Journey by Joseph Bates

Writing Tips – Articles

How to Write the First Draft of a Novel in 30 Days – The Guardian

5 Steps to Writing a Novel in 30 Days – Grammarly

20 Ways to Write a Book in 30 Days – Inc.

30 Tips for Writing a Book in 30 Days – Writer’s Digest

Writing a Novel in a Month: Is it Possible and Should You Try? – NY Book Editors

How to Finish Writing a Novel in 30 Days – Bustle


If you enjoyed this blog post, you may also like …

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

Learn How to Publish a Book

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/how-to-write-a-novel-in-a-month

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National Day of Listening

Everyone has a story to tell and everyone deserves to be heard. People feel appreciated, understood, and even loved when someone takes the time to really listen to them.

Lately, I’ve been reading articles and watching videos about how we’re all so connected yet less happy. I know just thinking about it is a bit of a downer, but really it’s an interesting topic and one that deserves more attention. In the age of social media we’re sharing more, but connecting less. What’s wrong with this picture? After all, how can you share more and yet still feel disconnected? So, ask yourself this: when was the last time you had a real conversation with someone and truly listened to the other person? By truly listening, I mean you weren’t just waiting for your turn to speak.

What is the National Day of Listening?

Launched in 2008 by StoryCorps, the National Day of Listening takes place every year the day after Thanksgiving. The project encourages people to sit down with a loved one and record a meaningful conversation.

An Intro to StoryCorps from our Founder Dave Isay


Let the library help you celebrate the National Day of Listening

Record Your Story

Storycorps launched the National Day of Listening as a way to encourage families to set aside the day after Thanksgiving as a time to share and record the history of their family, friends, and community.

Visit StoryCorps.org for a DIY guide and to upload your recording to Storycorps’ Wall of Listening. #NationalDayofListening

Use the Library’s recording studio to capture your interview on our equipment or use your phone in our acoustically ready space. Call the West Toledo Branch at 419-259-5290 or the King Road Branch at 419-259-5380 to learn more about our studio spaces.

Check out the Adrene Cole Collection

The African American Oral History Collection of Lucas County connects people and generations by preserving and sharing local voices and perspectives for future generations.

Claude Black | Adrene Cole Collection – Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Check out Sight and Sound

Join host Tom Walton as he interviews Toledo’s top public figures; celebrating their unique impact on Toledo history.

Sam Szor | Sight & Sound – Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Videos by StoryCorps

Two very curious brothers ask their dad some outlandish questions
Two nurse practitioners talk about treating infants exposed to opioids
Brian talks to Matt, who has been living on the streets, about the day they met
Ronald Clark remembers living inside a branch of the New York Public Library
The Bookmobile

Books by StoryCorps

Listening is an act of love : a celebration of American life from the StoryCorps Project / edited and with an introduction by Dave Isay
Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps by Dave Isay
Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps - edited by Dave Isay
StoryCorps OutLoud: Stories from the LGBTQ community, gathered by StoryCorps and heard on NPR - hosted by Ari Shapiro, featuring Dave Isay
All There Is: Love Stories from StoryCorps edited by Dave Isay

Ted Talks about technology, listening, and conversation

Connected, but alone? | Sherry Turkle – Ted Talks
 

The Power of deliberate listening | Ronnie Polaneczky – TEDxPhiladelphia

 

10 Ways to have a better conversation | Celeste Headlee – Ted Talks

Books about conversation and listening

The lost art of good conversation : a mindful way to connect with others and enrich everyday life / Sakyong Mipham
The Lost Art of Listening: How Learning to Listen Can Improve Relationships by Michael P. Nichols, PhD
Reclaiming conversation : the power of talk in a digital age / Sherry Turkle
We need to talk : how to have conversations that matter / Celeste Headlee

Articles about conversation and listening

The Lost Art of ConversationUSA Today

Is Conversation a Lost Art? – Wonderopolis

Saving the Lost Art of ConversationThe Atlantic

10 Tips to Talk About Anything with AnyonePsychology Today

The Art and Value of Good ListeningPsychology Today

Active Listening: Hear What People are Actually Saying – Mind Tools


Featured Image Credit: Conversation at the ‘IJ’ lake, Amsterdam by Thijs Paanakker (flickr)

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/national-day-of-listening.

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Writer’s Block

Creativity or creative inspiration may hit all at once or not at all for some writers. Those moments of nothingness are annoying, because they bring all creative projects to a halt, especially when they’re for school or cover topics that aren’t all that interesting. Writer’s block is one of the biggest problems that writers run into, both amateur and professional.

The library is a writer’s best resource, because there’s something for every type of writer. Poets – check out Writing Poetry from the Inside Out by Sandford Lyne if you’re looking for proper formations. If you’re interested in writing a memoir or an autobiography, try Write Your Life Story by Michael Oke. Struggling with ideas? Look into the Story Starter online for randomly generated writing prompts or even Fred D. White’s Where do you get your ideas? to find a concept and bring it to fruition. Just Write by James Scott Bell is another good one for fiction writers. And Writer’s Digest is a great website and magazine that’s highly recommended for general advice from experienced authors. Finally, don’t forget about the mechanics (i.e., grammar and citations). If you would like to become a grammar guru, definitely search for the Owl online for writing those pesky, exhausting college papers or William Strunk’s The Elements of Style.

Mess of Typewriter Ribbon - flickr
Photo by Julie Rybarczyk (flickr, some rights reserved).

While people may offer pseudointellectual advice on the subject – the best thing to do is tell yourself writer’s block doesn’t exist – it’s a mental construct. It’s difficult to avoid criticizing your own work, often hating it immediately after it’s written. However, if you just write whatever comes to mind, you’ll give yourself ideas to branch out from. For example, go outside when you feel like all of your creativity has dried up. Note every single thing that nature provides – like the birds flying overhead or the specific tangerine shade of the sky. Write everything and anything you see, think, and hear. Don’t pay attention to whether or not people will like what you write, just write what you would want to read. Try using the resources available to you, and remember, keep on writing, no matter what.

Books on Writing

The Elements of style / by William Strunk Jr. ; with revisions, an introduction, and a chapter on writing by E.B. White ; [foreword by Roger Angell]
Write your life story : how to organize and record your memories for family and friends to enjoy / Michael Oke
Around the writer's block : using brain science to solve writer's resistance / Rosanne Bane
Where do you get your ideas? : a writer's guide to transforming notions into narratives / Fred White
Just write : creating unforgettable fiction and a rewarding writing life / James Scott Bell

Writing Resources From the Web

The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

The Story Starter

Writer’s Digest

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Writing Workshops offered at Toledo Library
NaNoWriMo - National Novel Writing Month
Have you heard of NaNoWriMo? It’s short for National Novel Writing Month, which is an annual creative writing project. During the month of November, creative minds all over the country take up the challenge to write an entire book, at least 50,000 words. Believe it or not – anyone can do it. It just takes dedication and determination.Each year the University of Toledo hosts workshops and write-ins to encourage and inspire the creative mind. This year, we’re working in partnership with the University of Toledo to encourage people throughout the community to join them and learn more about the creative process. Each event will focus on a different way of creating literary works. These workshops are to help inspire works of literary art.

Creative Writing Events – Fall 2018

Timothy Geiger - University of Toledo Professor, English Department
Creative Writing and the Fine Art of Bookmaking

Fri. Sept. 21 | 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
King Road Branch Library

Timothy Geiger is a Professor in the English Department at the University of Toledo Professor. Mr. Geiger will hold a discussion and demonstration on the intersection of creative writing with the fine art of bookmaking. Registration required.

Skai Stelzer - University of Toledo Assistant Professor, English Department
Writing Haiku Poetry Workshop

Fri. Oct. 12, 2018 | 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Skai Stelzer is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Toledo. Ms. Stelzer will conduct a workshop for beginners on writing haiku poetry. Participants will leave the workshop with an original poem in hand. Registration required.

Matt Foss - University of Toledo Professor, Theatre Department
Adapting Literary Works for the Stage

Thurs. Oct. 18 | 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Matt Foss is an Assistant Professor in the Theatre Department at the University of Toledo. Mr. Foss will talk about the process he uses to translate great literary works to the stage. Registration required.

Leslie Welch - Young Adult Author
Writing Your First Novel

Tues. Nov. 6 | 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
University of Toledo Carlson Library
Dorothy Price Room (CL 2024)

Leslie Welch is a Young Adult Author. As part of National Novel Writing Month, Ms. Welch will conduct a workshop on writing your first novel. Registration required.

Topics include:

  • Creating Your Log Line
  • Building Your Plot
  • Tips for Writing Memorable Characters
  • Building Your Platform
  • Finishing Your First Draft

For more information: 

Visit The University of Toledo Carlson Library’s Nanowrimo Page
or contact lucy.duhon@utoledo.edu or mallorie.sutter@utoledo.edu


Quick NaNoWriMo Facts

  • Started in 1999 with 21 participants in the San Francisco Bay area.
  • By 2015, 431,626 people had participated in 633 different regions.
  • Since 2006, nearly 400 NaNoWriMo novels have been published through traditional publishing houses and over 200 novels have been published by smaller presses or self-published.

To learn more about NaNoWriMo and related events:

National Novel Writing Month – University of Toledo


Related Toledo Library Blog Posts

How To Write a Novel in a Month

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

The Art of Storytelling: 5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Authors

Memoir Writing Resources

Developing Characters That Resonate With Readers

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Learn How To Publish A Book

Toledo Lucas County Public Library
University of Toledo Libraries

Blog post composed by:

April Schwarzkopf
Blog Editor
Adult Services Librarian
Toledo Lucas County Public Library
Lucy Duhon
Collections Sharing Coordinator
Scholarly Communications Librarian
University of Toledo, Carlson Library
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Memoir Writing Resources

We field a lot of questions at the library about writing memoirs. It may be the fact that everyone has a story they want to share with the world or maybe they just want to become famous? Whatever the reasons – a few questions usually come up:

What’s the difference between an autobiography and a memoir? – Autobiographies tell the entire story of someone’s life (from start to finish), while memoirs focus on one story.

What makes a good memoir? – Like anything, a “good story” is really a matter of opinion. However, the resources below may help you focus your efforts.

Books on Writing the Story of Your Life (Memoir/Autobiography)

The art of memoir / Mary Karr
Writing about your life : a journey into the past / William Zinsser
The Memoir project : a thoroughly non-standardized text for writing & life / Marion Roach Smith
The story of you : a guide for writing your personal stories and family history / John Bond
How to write a memoir in 30 days : step-by-step instructions for creating and publishing your personal story / Roberta Temes, PhD
The truth of memoir : how to write about yourself and others with honesty, emotion, and integrity / Kerry Cohen
Writing your legacy : the step-by-step guide to crafting your life story / Richard Campbell M.Ed. and Cheryl Svensson, Ph.D
Telling your story : preserve your history through storytelling / by Jerry Apps
Your Story: How to Write It So Others Will Want to Read It by Joanne Fedler
How To Write Your Personal Or Family History by Katie Wiebe
Writing Your Life: A Guide to Writing Autobiographies
Writing What You Know: How to Turn Personal Experiences into Publishable Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry by Meg Files
Online Tips on Writing Your Memoir

5 Tips for Writing a Memoir – Publisher’s Weekly

8 Writing Tips That Will Make You a Powerful Storyteller – The Writing Cooperative

Great Tips on How to Write Your Memoir – Reader’s Digest

How to Write a Memoir: 6 Creative Ways to Tell a Powerful Story – The Write Life

How to Write a Good Memoir: Advice on Finding Your Voice – Writer’s Digest

How to Write a Memoir that People Care About – NY Book Editors

Originally posted on: ToledoLibrary.org/blog/memoir-writing-resources by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S.

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The Art of Storytelling: 5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

Are you an aspiring writer trying to get started on that next bestselling novel?

Are you an experienced writer, but need a little help creating compelling storylines or dynamic dialogue?

No matter where you’re at in the writing process your Library can help! We have a ton of great writing resources to help you from start to finish.

5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

Tip 1: Avoid Common Plot Cliches

We all know a cliche when we see it in a movie or read it in a book. It’s important to think about how cliches annoy you when you come across them, so you’ll be less likely to include them in your own work. By writing a story that only you can tell, instead of borrowing from popular formulas, it will be fairly easy to avoid common plot pitfalls.

We read so that we can be moved by a new way of looking at things. A cliche is like a coin that has been handled too much. Once language has been overly handled, it no longer leaves a clear imprint. ~ Janet Fitch

Tip 2: Generate New Story Ideas by Asking – What If?

If you’re having trouble generating new story ideas – try the what if question game. What if you lived in an alternate universe? What if you had to change occupations? What if you were alive during the early 1900s? By asking a series of what if questions with your personal experiences and interests in mind you’ll be able to ensure your stories are coming from a place of sincerity.

Alternate history fascinates me, as it fascinates all novelists, because ‘What if?’ is the big thing. ~ Kate Atkinson

Tip 3: Use the Power of Emotion

Engage readers with emotional content. Readers that feel emotionally invested in the characters or story won’t want to put the book down. After all, emotion often overrides reason in the human brain (compelling reasonable people to stay up all night reading).

A plot is nothing but a normal human situation that keeps arising again and again….normal human emotions—envy, ambition, rivalry, love, hate, greed, and so on.
~ Louis L’Amour

Tip 4: Create Characters That Resonate With Readers

It’s important for readers to feel connected to your characters. Think about what you can do to make them seem more real to the audience. Research facts, build backstories and create character profiles to ensure they are truly authentic.

As a writer, I demand the right to write any character in the world that I want to write. I demand the right to be them, I demand the right to think them and I demand the right to tell the truth as I see they are. ~ Quentin Tarantino

Tip 5: Draft Dynamic Dialogue

Effective dialogue helps to bring characters to life and advance the story. Read authors renowned for dialogue to find inspiration when writing your own.

If you are using dialogue — say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech. ~ John Steinbeck


Craft Compelling Stories With the Help of These Great Books

The Writer's Guide to Beginnings: How to Craft Story Openings That Sell by Paula Munier
The Irresistible Novel: How to Craft an Extraordinary Story that Engages Readers from Start to Finish by Jeff Gerke
Writing with Emotion, Tension, and Conflict: Techniques for Crafting an Expressive and Compelling Novel by Cheryl St. John
The Secrets of Story: Innovative Tools for Perfecting Your Fiction and Captivating Readers by Matt Bird
Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction by Jeff Vandermeer
The Emotional Craft of Fiction - How to Write the Story Beneath the Surface by Donald Maass (eBook)
Crafting Dynamic Dialogue: The Complete Guide to Speaking, Conversing, Arguing, and Thinking in Fiction from the editors of Writer's Digest; foreword by Cheryl St. John
Damn Fine Story: Mastering the Tools of a Powerful Narrative by Chuck Wendig (eBook)
The Art and Craft of Storytelling by Nancy Lamb (eBook)
Spellbinding Sentences by Barbara Baig (eBook)

Learn More About the Art of Storytelling With These Helpful Articles

Three Powerful Ways to Brainstorm New Story Ideas – Well-Storied

5 Golden Rules for Writing Authentic Dialogue – Writer’s Edit

5 Elements for Crafting a Compelling Story Your Audience Will Love – Write to Done

5 Tips For Creating Characters Readers Can’t Wait to Come Back To – The Creative Penn

5 Tips on Writing Dialogue – NY Book Editors

7 Simple Ways to Make a Good Story Great – Writer’s Digest

Ten Authors Who Write Great Dialogue – LitReactor

10 Easy Ways to Improve Your Dialogue – Write to Done

10 Tips to Avoid Cliches in Writing – Writer’s Digest

The 7 Tools of Dialogue – Writer’s Digest

Emotion vs. Feeling: How to Evoke More From Readers – Writer’s Digest

Novel Settings: 7 Tips to Get Setting Description Right – Now Novel

Some of the Greatest Writers of Dialogue (And What We Can Learn From Them) – Gizmodo

Story Plots: 7 Tips for Writing Original Stories – Now Novel

Your Novel’s First Scene: How to Start Right – Jane Friedman


Toledo Library Blog Posts on Writing

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

Developing Characters that Resonate with Readers

How to Write a Novel in a Month

Learn How to Publish a Book

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