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Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Raising Awareness: The Silent Witness Project at the Toledo Library

Domestic violence is an International epidemic

Defined as the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault and/or other abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another;  there is no corner of the world where domestic violence does not reach. Domestic violence affects individuals in every community regardless of age, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion or nationality.The devastating physical, emotional and psychological consequences of domestic violence can cross generations and last a lifetime. For women, the threat of death due to domestic violence is very real – especially when they begin to take steps to leave.

Please join the Steinem Sisters Collection at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library (TLCPL) as we honor those lost to domestic violence in the Toledo area and raise awareness of the continued fight to end domestic violence.

The Silent Witness Project

19 Year Old Victim
In 1990, the Silent Witness Initiative began with a goal to promote education through community-based exhibits in an effort to end domestic violence. It started with a small group of volunteers in one state and grew into an international movement, with projects in all 50 states and 23 countries.

The Northwest Ohio Silent Witness Project, which is housed and maintained at the Bethany House of Toledo, currently consists of over 55 Silent Witnesses whose lives were abruptly and violently ended at the hands of a husband, ex-husband, partner or stalker.

For the month of October, TLCPL’s Reynolds Corners Branch Library will be exhibiting 10 Witnesses in an effort to remember the stories and names of these women.

Library Events in 2018

The Silent Witness Project Exhibit

Oct. 1 – Nov. 2 | During Library Hours | Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Domestic Violence Information Sessions

TLCPL is also partnering with the Bethany House to offer several information sessions about domestic violence. These sessions will focus on 1 of 2 topics and will be held at several branches throughout the library system.

Recognizing Domestic Violence

Oct. 4 | 1:00 p.m. | Waterville Branch Library
Oct. 25 | 6:30 p.m. | Oregon Branch Library

Children and Domestic Violence

Oct. 10 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library
Oct. 24 | 7:00 p.m. | Maumee Branch Library

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Haunted Midwest Travel for Those Who Dare!

I don’t know about you, but I come from a long line of non-scaredy cats! You just can’t spook my family and friends, much as you may try. And yet, they all love scary movies, books, and places!     

My mom’s probably not going to be super happy about my sharing this – but my love affair with all things spooky started in elementary school, when she and my dad made the mistake of letting me watch The Exorcist. They had guests over and I heard the voice of my beloved babysitter Missy – so I crept out to see her, and they let me stay up and watch it with them. I was PETRIFIED, but have been feeding the need to be scared ever since.      

Like my family and friends, I too have a passion for all things scary – Halloween, haunted houses (real and fake), horror movies, and the like. My best friend and I even toured one of America’s most haunted places – The Waverly Hills Sanatorium. It was really cool to walk through the place, but I was (and always am) disappointed that I neither felt nor viewed anything of the paranormal sense. Others in our group said they did…which leads me on my continued search.      

So, do ghosts really exist? I don’t know, but I will never stop trying to discover the answer!     

If you’re like me, and you love to be scared, here are a few regional locations you can visit to get your spooky fix, along with some companion books and movies! 

Ohio State (Mansfield) Reformatory, Mansfield OH   

Have you seen the movies The Green Mile, Tango & Cash, or Air Force One? All three films feature footage of the Ohio State Reformatory!      

This sprawling and legendary prison has been featured in countless TV shows, documentaries, and books, including on Season 3 (episode 4) of the Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures and Season 1 (episode 5) of the National Geographic Channel’s Inside Secret America: Ghosts.      

The reformatory was opened in the early 1900’s and closed officially per a United States Federal Court ruling (the Boyd Consent Decree) in the 1990’s. During its time in operation, more than 150,000 prisoners passed through its doors. Many died due to violence, influenza, tuberculosis, or other diseases. One of the most tragic incidents associated with the Ohio State Reformatory occurred in July 1948, when the farm boss, his wife, and daughter were kidnapped and shot by two parolees known as the “mad-dog killers.”     

I’ve not yet had the chance to take one of the reformatory’s public ghost hunts, but I did attend one of their Murder Mystery Dinner Theaters. It was a blast and the food was surprisingly delicious! I highly recommend it.

Related BooksThe Haunted History of the Ohio State Reformatory by Sherri Brake  The Ohio State Reformatoryby Nancy K. Darbey

Loveland Castle, Loveland OH   

Did you know there’s a castle in Ohio? Well there is, and it’s really cool…and apparently haunted. It also has an interesting story as far as how it came to be!      

The castle was built by Harry Delos, who constructed it (mostly by hand) “as an expression and reminder of the simple strength and rugged grandeur of the mighty men who lived when Knighthood was in flower.” Loveland Castle has a sense of humor about its ghostly grounds too – the “Activities” section of its website reads:      

Ghosts.  If you believe in ghosts…the Castle has them! If you don’t…fine, be that way! Either way, you will find pictures of the Castle’s ghosts and ghost stories galore at the Castle! 

Related BookOhio Historic Haunts: Investigating the Paranormal in the Buckeye State by James Willis  

Waverly Hills Sanatorium, Louisville KY  

Waverly Hills Sanatorium has a rather sad history. In the early 1900s, the Board of Tuberculosis Hospital constructed a sanatorium that could accommodate up to 50 tuberculosis patients. Eventually, tuberculosis reached epidemic levels in the surrounding communities, and the sanatorium was expanded to accommodated over 400 patients.      

At its height, Waverly Hills was known as one of the most advanced tuberculosis sanatoriums in the country. Despite this, most of the patients succumbed to the disease and (as was common practice) were often subjected to painful and bizarre “treatments” such as having balloons surgically implanted into their lungs.  

Waverly Hills has been featured on Season 3 (episode 18) of the SyFy Channel’s Ghost Hunters, and Season 2 (episode 5) of TLC’s Paranormal Lockdown. As far as hauntings, the most prolific sightings surround a boy (dubbed “Timmy”) who plays with a ball along the 3rd floor as well as sightings in room 502, which is believed (and was told during our tour) to have been the location where a nurse hung herself as a result of an out-of-wedlock pregnancy in 1928.

Today, Waverly Hills is owned by “historical and paranormal enthusiasts,” Charles and Tina Mattingly who operate the sanatorium as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, offering ghost tours, a haunted house, and laser light shows.

Related BooksHaunted Hospitals: Eerie Tales About Hospitals, Sanatoriums, & Other Institutions by Mark LeslieHaunted Asylums, Prisons, and Sanatoriums : Inside the Abandoned Institutions for the Crazy, Criminal & Quarantined by Jamie Davis  

The Masonic Temple, Detroit MI     

If you haven’t ever attended an event inside of the Masonic Temple, I implore you to do so! It is the world’s largest Masonic Temple – an absolutely beautiful and magnificent Gothic revival building with 14 floors and 1,000 rooms full of winding stairways, secret passages, and ornate sculptures and lighting.      

In fact, the Masonic Temple is so grand that its construction is said to have left architect George D. Mason bankrupt. Unfounded gossip also says that as a result, his wife left him and he committed suicide by jumping from the top of the building – however, in reality Mason died in 1948 at the age of 92.      

That hasn’t stopped it from being included in most “haunted Michigan” lists, nor has it detracted interest from numerous paranormal investigative teams, including 313 Paranormal, the Marter Paranormal Research Team, and the Erie Shores Paranormal.      

Other notable paranormal activity that’s been widely experienced are slamming doors, knocking, and other random bumps in the night. If you’re interested in taking a tour, the Temple offers building tours or if you really want to ramp up the spooky factor, why not attend one of the most beloved Halloween parties in the world there – Theatre Bizarre – which is held each year inside of the Masonic Temple!

Related BooksDetroit Ghosts by Mimi Staver  Ghosts of Southeast Michigan by Kristy Robinett  

Disclaimer: The information included in this blog post is for educational purpose only. The Toledo Lucas County Public Library does not endorse any businesses featured in this blog post.

Originally posted at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/haunted-midwest-travel-for-those-who-dare by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Heather H.

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12 Words Coined in Fiction

What do the words robot, chortle and malapropism all have in common?

Answer: they were all coined in fiction.

While fiction authors dazzle us with their ability to conjure fantastic worlds and unforgettable characters, their creativity has often been obstructed by mankind’s limited vocabulary. Hence, fiction authors have had to create their own words.

Many of these “made up” words have faded to obscurity since their first utterance. But, some have become a part of our common vernacular. Take a look at these twelve words and their literary origins – some of them may surprise you.

Literary Origins of Words

BLATANT

[bleyt-nt]

Likely an alteration of the Latin word blatire, meaning “to babble.” The word was coined by Edmund Spencer in his epic poem “The Faerie Queen” published in 1590. In the poem Spencer describes the Blatant Beast, a thousand-tongued monster representing slander.

“The Faerie Queene” by Edmund Spencer

Print | eBook | eAudio

The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser

CHORTLE

[chawr-tl]

Possibly a combination of chuckle and snort. Coined by Lewis Carroll in his iconic poem, “The Jabberwocky” originally published in 1871.

“O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! He chortled in his joy.”

“Through the Looking Glass” by Lewis Carroll

Print | Audio |
eBook | eAudio | DVD

The Annotated Alice : Alice's adventures in Wonderland & Through the looking-glass by Lewis Carroll

GARGANTUAN

[gahr-gan-choo-uh n]

This word comes from the character Gargantua, a giant from Francis Rabelais’ 5 book series “Gargantua and Pantagruel” published between 1693–1694.

“Gargantua and Pantagruel” by Francis Rabelais

Print | eBook | eAudio

Gargantua And Pantagruel by Francois Rabelais

MALAPROPISM

[mal-uh-prop-iz-uh m]

From the character Ms. Malaprop in Sheridan’s “The Rivals” published in 1775, who was known for her comical misuse of complex words.

“The Rivals” by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

Print | eBook | eAudio

The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

MENTOR

[men-tawr, -ter]

From the character Mentor who, in Homer’s Odyssey, is entrusted with the care and Teaching of Odysseus’ son, Telemachus.

“The Odyssey” by Homer

Print | eBook | eAudio

The Odyssey by Home ; translated by Emily Wilson

NERD

[nurd]

The first instance of this word in print was Dr Seuss’ “If I Ran the Zoo” published in 1950. Here, the word describes an imaginary creature that the narrator of the story wishes to own. Possibly a play on “nert,” a word commonly used in the 1940s to describe eccentric or nutty people.

“If I Ran the Zoo” by Dr. Seuss

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If I Ran the Zoo by Dr. Seuss

PANDEMONIUM

[pan-duh-moh-nee-uh m]

In John Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” published in the year 1667, Pandemonium is the name of the capitol of Hell. The prefix “pan” denotes “all” and “demon” means… “demon.” The word is commonly used to describe utter chaos and confusion.

“Paradise Lost” by John Milton

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Paradise Lost by John Milton

ROBOT

[roh-buh t, -bot]

From the Czech word robota meaning “forced labor.” First used in its current form by Karel Čapek in his play “Rossum’s Universal Robots” from 1920.

“Rossum’s Universal Robots” by Karel Čapek

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Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek

SERENDIPITY

[ser-uh n-dip-i-tee]

Coined by the art historian Horace Walpole, inspired by “The Three Princes of Serendip” originally published in Venice in 1557. According to Walpole, he was inspired by the way the princes in the story were “always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of.”

“The Three Princes of Serendip” by Elizabeth Jamison Hodges

Print

The Three Princes of Serendip by Elizabeth Jamison Hodges

STENTORIAN

[sten-tawr-ee-uh n, -tohr-]

Named after Stentor, Greek herald during the Trojan War. Homer’s “Iliad” describes Stentor’s voice as being loud as 50 men. Now the word is used synonymously with “loud.”

“The Iliad” by Homer

PrinteBookeAudio

The Iliad by Homer

TRILBY

[tril-bee]

As in the narrow-brimmed hat often mistaken for a fedora. Named after George du Maurier’s novel Trilby from 1894. The book was adapted to Theatre in 1895, the opening night of which saw many trilby hats on display.

“Trilby” by George du Maurier

PrinteBook | eAudio

Trilby by George Du Maurier

UTOPIA

[yoo-toh-pee-uh]

From the Greek phrase eu-topos, meaning “good place.” The nearly identical ou-topos means “no place” or “nowhere.” It’s no wonder that Thomas More chose “Utopia” as the name for the fictional island society in his 1516 book of political satire.

“Utopia” by Thomas More

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Utopia by Thomas More
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Reading Behind the Headlines: Finding Reliable Information in the Post-Truth Era

Partner blog post by librarians Melissa J. and Teresa A.

Distinguishing Fact from Fiction

A few months ago, one of our teen customers came up to our reference desk to say hello and to tell me about a piece of concerning news she read on the internet. The teen told me she read that ICE had thrown a pregnant woman over the wall to prevent her from having a baby on U.S. soil. At first, I felt a wave of shock upon hearing this disturbing information, which was quickly followed by skepticism. I asked the teen where she had obtained this upsetting news and she informed me that she read it on Facebook. This triggered my inner librarian and I immediately turned to the computer to find the article and check its accuracy. With one keyword search on Google, I discovered the photo with the troubling headline was published on “The Onion,” a satirical newspaper. I attempted to explain to the teen that the article was satire, not real news, and we debated about how fake and photoshopped the featured photo was in reality.

This exchange is a prime example of the current issues surrounding our ability, and often inability, to distinguish between real, false or misleading information. While we would like to believe that this is only a problem amongst our teens, we know that even adults can struggle to make this distinction as misleading information has become more sophisticated and purposefully harder to identify. Finding reliable and relevant information from credible sources is a basic building block for being an informed citizen. Yet, the ability to distinguish between credible and misleading information requires an acute attention to detail. To be sure, the devil is in the details.

Consider the following web addresses:

www.whitehouse.gov

www.whitehouse.com

www.whitehouse.org

Whitehouse.gov is the official government website for information about the White House and the current administration. Whitehouse.com is a website with a controversial history of featuring adult content (“SITES WE hate,” 2002). It currently features short political news stories and surveys. Finally, whitehouse.org is a parody website. While these websites appear to be very similar, the content they feature is very different. It is easy to see that the slightest variation, which to many people may appear to be an unimportant difference, has a significant impact on the actual content. In many cases, details are key to understanding “where” you are on the internet and, in turn, in distinguishing the credibility of a particular web address. Most web addresses ending in “.com” are related to commercial businesses, web addresses ending in “.gov” are government websites, and those ending in “.org” are generally related to non-profit organizations. Simply knowing these small details about a web address can help lead you to credible and reliable information.

This is true too, when it comes to understanding information. It is important to recognize the origins of the information that is being conveyed. For example, let’s review the misinformation provided by the teen. She believed the article was real because she failed to identify is origins. If she had, she would have realized that the article was meant to be humorous because it was derived from a satirical newspaper. Acknowledging the distinction is very important.

The best advice we can provide is to be skeptical of information obtained online and do additional research. Through our library website customers have access to numerous educational and scholarly resources, many of which, can be accessed from your home computer with internet access, a library card, and pin number. Also, included below are links to various fact-checking websites and additional reading recommendations concerning current information issues. Another option is to ask your local librarian and let them do the work for you. Finally, we encourage you to join us for a special event:

Reading Behind the Headlines: Finding Reliable Information in the Post-Truth Era

September 4, 2018 | 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. | Kent Branch Library

Hear local media specialists discuss the work that goes behind publishing the news and learn about resources you can use to evaluate sources and find reliable information.

This program seeks to help attendees distinguish between credible and unreliable news sources. During the program, attendees will hear from local media specialists who will discuss the work that goes on behind publishing the news. We will also discuss how you can use library resources to evaluate sources and find reliable information.

Blog Post Citations

University of Michigan to Help Citizens Spot Fake News – Michigan Radio (written by Tracy Samilton, published on April 18, 2017)

ICE Agents Hurl Pregnant Immigrant Over Mexican Border to Prevent Birth on U.S. Soil – The Onion (published January 18, 2018)

Did ICE Hurl a Pregnant Woman Over a Border Wall? – Snopes.com (written by Kim LaCapria, published on June 26, 2018)

SITES WE hate – Yahoo! Internet Life (published May 2002, vol. 8, issue 5, page 66)

Fact Checking: Internet Resources

  • Whois.com: Use this website to identify who owns a particular website
  • Allsides.com: Compare how news outlets cover the same topic
  • Opensecrets.org: Track campaign contributions on this nonpartisan website
  • Factcheck.org: Fact check popular stories in the news and on social media
  • Politifact.com: Ranks the truthfulness of claims and statements made by politicians and provides explanations for their ranking
  • Snopes.com: Fact checking news stories
  • Blue Feed, Red Feed: See how different your Facebook Newsfeed can look based on your political leanings
  • Media Bias Fact Check: Explore this site to find out about the bias of the information sources you access.

Additional Reading Recommendations

Related Library Books

Overload : finding the truth in today's deluge of news / Bob Schieffer with H. Andrew Schwartz
Finding Reliable Information Online: Adventures of an Information Sleuth by Leslie F. Stebbins
Research Strategies: Finding your way through the information fog by William Badke
Smart Online Searching: Doing Digital Research by Mary Lindeen

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Let us help you!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

toledolibrary.org/Give3Get!
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The Toledo Troopers Digital Collection is Growing!

Beverly Severance, former middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers during their 1974 and 1975 seasons, recently loaned her personal collection to the Local History and Genealogy Department for digitization. The first item of her collection is a 1975 photograph of Toledo Troopers Coach Bill Stout driving a convertible with five players in an East Toledo Parade. The players include, from left to right, Pam Schwartz, Mitchi Collette, Sheila Browne, Beverly Severance and Dorothy Parma. Two of the additional items are visible in the photograph. The vintage t-shirt is nearly identical to the one she is wearing in the photo. A mini souvenir football, like the ones the players were throwing to the crowd, is another item. Her collection also includes her portrait in uniform, number 53.

Samples from Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s Toledo Troopers Online Exhibit

Photo of Beverly Severance - Toledo Troopers 1970s

Beverly Severance photograph, 1970s

This colored photograph belongs to Beverly Severance. It is her portrait taken during the time she played middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers, number 53, during the 1974 and 1975 seasons.

 

Photo of a Toledo Troopers souvenir football - 1970s

Toledo Troopers souvenir football, 1970s

This miniature, souvenir football belongs to Beverly Severance. It is yellow with green lettering, and “Toledo Troopers; League Champions, National Women’s Football” is printed on it. Footballs like this one were thrown to the crowd in the parade in which Beverly, some of her teammates, and her coach were photographed in. The footballs are also visible in the photograph that is a part of Beverly’s collection. She played middle linebacker, number 53, for the Toledo Troopers for the 1974 and 1975 seasons.

Toledo Troopers - Vintage T-Shirt 1970s

Toledo Troopers vintage t-shirt, 1970s

This vintage, Toledo Troopers t-shirt belongs to Beverly Severance. It is white with green print. Beverly played middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers during the 1974 and 1975 seasons as number 53. The t-shirt is similar to the one in which she was photographed with her teammates and coach in a 1975 parade in East Toledo.

 


Beverly’s loan enriches the Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s digital collection that several other Toledo Troopers have also generously loaned their items to, in order to record their incredible history. They include: Guy Stout (former waterboy and son of Coach Bill Stout), and former players Mitchi Collette, Pam Hardy Fisher, Linda Jefferson, Gloria Jimenez, and Eunice White. The entire collection can be viewed at Ohio Memory.

Toledo Troopers Logo

Toledo Troopers Movie and More

If you haven’t heard of the Toledo Troopers yet, get ready to hear a lot more about them! During their nine-year existence from 1971 through 1979, they won seven national championships and held an impressive record that boasted only four games lost out of sixty-eight played. They were recognized in 1983 as the “Winningest Pro Football Team Ever” by the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Be on the lookout for …

A book by Steve Guinan, titled “Perfect Season.”

The Ohio History Connection in Columbus, Ohio, is planning an exhibit highlighting Ohio’s contributions to sports that will open on March 16, 2019, which will include the Toledo Troopers.

A documentary is also in the works, by Communica – check out the trailer.

 

Originally posted by Gayle H. on ToledoLibrary.org/blog/our-online-toledo-troopers-exhibit-is-growing

 

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Reading is My Business, And Business is Good!

There are so many great business and leadership books out recently that appeal to even the most un-business-y readers! Take a look…

Business, Entrepreneurship and Industry

Valley of genius : the uncensored history of Silicon Valley, as told by the hackers, founders, and freaks who made it boom / Adam Fisher
Wisdom @ work : the making of a modern elder / Chip Conley
Fins : Harley Earl, the rise of General Motors, and the glory days of Detroit / William Knoedelseder

Valley of Genius: the Uncensored History of Silicon Valley, as Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made it Boom by Adam Fisher

Lively, fascinating, and educational, sometimes a book sneaks up on readers, prompting us to realize that its topic is a lot more interesting than we might have thought. This is an oral history of Silicon Valley and the rock-star legends in the industry, told by the people who were there from the beginning.

Wisdom at Work: the Making of a Modern Elder by Chip Conley

Experience is making a comeback. At age 52, newly retired hotelier CEO Chip Conley received a call from the young founders of Airbnb, asking him to help grow their start-up into a global hospitality giant. He had the industry experience, but Conley was lacking in the digital fluency of his 20-something colleagues. Roughly twice the age of the average Airbnb employee and reporting to a CEO young enough to be his son, Conley quickly discovered that while he’d been hired as a teacher and mentor, he was also in many ways a student and intern. What emerged is the secret to thriving as a mid-life worker: learning to marry wisdom and experience with curiosity, a beginner’s mind, and a willingness to evolve, all hallmarks of the “Modern Elder.”

Fins: Harley Earl, the Rise of General Motors, and the Glory Days of Detroit by William Knoedelseder

Chronicles the birth and rise to greatness of the American auto industry through the remarkable life of Harley Earl, an eccentric six-foot-five, stuttering visionary who dropped out of college and went on to invent the profession of automobile styling, thereby revolutionized the way cars were made, marketed, and even imagined. His impact was profound. When he retired as GM’s VP of Styling in 1958, Detroit reigned as the manufacturing capitol of the world and General Motors ranked as the most successful company in the history of business.

Billion dollar whale : the man who fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the world / Tom Wright and Bradley Hope
Dear founder : letters of advice for anyone who leads, manages, or wants to start a business / Maynard Webb
Crashed : how a decade of financial crises changed the world / Adam Tooze

Billion Dollar Whale: the Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World by Bradley Hope and Tom Wright

True-story thriller about a man who managed to swindle over $5 billion with the aid of Goldman Sachs and others that exposes the secret nexus of elite wealth, banking, Hollywood, and politics from two award-winning Wall Street Journal reporters. In 2009, with the dust yet to settle on the housing bubble financial crisis, a seemingly mild-mannered Wharton grad began setting in motion a fraud of unprecedented gall and magnitude–one that would come to symbolize the next great threat to the global financial system. An epic true-tale of hubris and greed, Billion Dollar Whale reveals how this young social climber pulled off one of the biggest heists in history–right under the nose of the global financial industry.

Dear Founder: Letters of Advice for Anyone Who Leads, Manages, or Wants to Start a Business by Maynard Webb

Wise, practical, and profitable letters to entrepreneurs, leaders, managers, and business owners in every field—from a leading executive, investor, and business founder. More than 600,000 new businesses are launched each year. How does an entrepreneur build and manage a workplace—and create a lasting legacy? Maynard Webb has helped found, fund, and grow dozens of successful companies, and has driven strategic change at Salesforce, eBay, Everwise, and Visa, among other worldwide corporations. Known for offering savvy insight, encouragement, and a dose of reality in the form of engaging personal letters to a select group of business leaders, Webb now shares his lessons with the rest of America’s aspiring entrepreneurs—at any age and stage in their careers.

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crisis Changed the World by Adam Tooze

From a prizewinning economic historian, an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis (and its ten-year aftermath) as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. In September 2008, a dramatic economic cascade of global significance spiraled around the world, from the financial markets of the US and Europe to the factories and dockyards of Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, forcing a rearrangement of global governance. It was the greatest crisis to have struck Western societies since the end of the Cold War, but was it inevitable? And is it over? Finally, Tooze asks, given this history, what now are the prospects for a stable, sustainable and coherent world order?

Cousins Maine Lobster : how one food truck became a multimillion-dollar business / Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac ; with Blake D. Dvorak ; foreword by Barbara Corcoran
The gambler : how penniless dropout Kirk Kerkorian became the greatest deal maker in capitalist history / William C. Rempel
The bonanza king : John Mackay and the battle over the greatest riches in the American West / Gregory Crouch

Cousins Maine Lobster: How One Food Truck Became a Multimillion-Dollar Business by Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac

In early 2012, Jim Tselikis visited L.A. and met up with his cousin Sabin Lomac. Over a few drinks they waxed nostalgic about their childhood in Maine, surrounded by family, often elbow deep in delicious lobster while gathered around the picnic table. From this strong memory was born the very first Cousins Maine Lobster food truck. Smart, authentic marketing, and sustainable, delicious ingredients helped turn that one food truck into an overnight sensation. Then, in just three years, they went from a single food truck to a nationally-franchised legion of trucks, an online delivery service, and a brick-and-mortar restaurant, grossing over $15 million dollars in sales a year.

Start-up fever has taken hold of America, and there are hundreds of books to teach readers how to become an entrepreneur; this is the first book to answer the question: What’s next? At each step, Jim and Sabin were faced with hard decisions—opening each new food truck carefully instead of rushing to meet the demand; turning down a six-figure franchise offer because it came from someone who didn’t support their vision; turning down “Shark Tank” (twice) until they could insist on participating only if Barbara Corcoran was one of the Sharks. Now Jim and Sabin teach readers how they, too, can reach the next level of success in their own businesses, without having to compromise themselves.

The Gambler: How Penniless Dropout Kirk Kerkorian Became the Greatest Deal Maker in Capitalist History by William C. Rempel

The rags-to-riches story of one of America’s wealthiest and least-known financial giants, self-made billionaire Kirk Kerkorian—the daring aviator, movie mogul, risk-taker, and business tycoon who transformed Las Vegas and Hollywood to become one of the leading financiers in American business. Kerkorian never put his name on a building, but when he died he owned almost every major hotel and casino in Las Vegas. He envisioned and fostered a new industry —the leisure business. Three times he built the biggest resort hotel in the world. Three times he bought and sold the fabled MGM Studios, forever changing the way Hollywood does business.

In this engrossing biography, investigative reporter William C. Rempel digs deep into Kerkorian’s long-guarded history to introduce a man of contradictions—a poorly educated genius for deal-making, an extraordinarily shy man who made the boldest of business ventures, a careful and calculating investor who was willing to bet everything on a single roll of the dice.

The Bonanza King: John Mackay and the Battle Over the Greatest Riches in the American West by Gregory Crouch

Born in 1831, John W. Mackay was a penniless Irish immigrant who went to California during the Gold Rush and mined without much luck for eight years. When he heard of riches found on the other side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1859, Mackay abandoned his claim and walked a hundred miles to the Comstock Lode in Nevada.

Over the course of the next dozen years, Mackay worked his way up from nothing, seizing control of the most concentrated cache of precious metals ever found on earth, the legendary “Big Bonanza,” a stupendously rich body of gold and silver ore discovered 1,500 feet beneath the streets of Virginia City, the ultimate Old West boomtown. But for the ore to be worth anything it had to be found, claimed, and successfully extracted, each step requiring enormous risk and the creation of an entirely new industry.

When Mackay died in 1902, front-page obituaries in Europe and the United States hailed him as one of the most admired Americans of the age. Featuring great period photographs and maps, The Bonanza King is a dazzling tour de force, a riveting history of Virginia City, Nevada, the Comstock Lode, and America itself.


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Podcasts: What are They and Why Should I Care?

I have a confession to make; I can’t stop listening to podcasts. For years now, people have asked me what book I’m reading/listening to and most of the time I shamefully mumble something about not having much time, or finding it difficult to discover new books I like. This, however, is a bold-faced lie. The truth is that podcasts have taken over my life. I listen to them when I’m cleaning, driving, getting ready, falling asleep, waking up, cooking (ok, that’s a stretch – more like microwaving). Just ask my husband who so graciously hid his eye rolls for almost an entire year when every other sentence out of my mouth was “I was listening to This American Life…”

To all of you who are reading this asking, “What’s a podcast?” – my response is: only the greatest invention to be popularized by the smartphone. Imagine being able to listen to your favorite radio broadcast at any time, in any place. Or consuming bite-sized documentaries that are delivered to your phone automatically and captivate from the first minute. And the best part is that anyone (even you!) can make and distribute a podcast, making the range of content available absolutely remarkable. I know what you’re thinking, “But Allison, how do we know what is worth listening to and what’s not if anyone can make anything?” Never fear. That’s what I’m here for.

Below you will find a list of some of the best freely-available podcasts around. They cover a breadth of topics to suit anyone’s interests as well as provide an easy route to discover something new. Most smartphones have a podcast app preloaded on the device at purchase where these titles can be found. They can also be found on the respective websites for each cast.

And once you’ve listened through this list and decided to become a podcaster yourself, come on down to the King Road or West Toledo branch libraries where our recording studios are waiting to turn your podcast idea into my next obsession.

General Interest

This American Life

No list of podcasts would be complete without This American Life. One of the longest running NPR offerings, Ira Glass’s iconic radio show looks at different aspects of life in America (and sometimes beyond) and offers new perspectives on ideas of all kinds. So many people you’ve probably heard of have contributed to TAL including David Sedaris, David Rakoff, Sarah Vowell, John Hodgeman, and many (many, many more). Personal favorites of mine are episodes 107: Trail of Tears and 199: House on Loon Lake.

Listen Alikes:

Invisibilia

Strangers


True Crime

Serial

If you’ve heard of any of these, chances are it’s Serial, the smash-hit from 2014 that dove deep into a murder that took place back in 1999. Because it’s unsolved? No. A man named Adnan Syed is currently serving time for the crime. But should he be? Sarah Koenig investigates and tells the story episode by episode, sometimes only hours after she has learned new developments herself. If you want a story that is all but guaranteed to hook you, this is where you should start. (Seriously, before this no one would have guessed that cell phone records could be so enthralling.) This one requires serial listening (Get it? 😉 ) so you’ll want to start with Ep. 1: The Alibi.

Listen Alikes:

In the Dark

Criminal


Science and Technology

Radiolab

Polar opposites and conversational wizards Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich explore all things science in a way that feels a little closer to performance art than information sharing. From the beautifully haunting contributions of the late Oliver Sacks in episodes such as “Oliver Sacks’ Table of Elements” to episodes like “The Ceremony” that are just plain creepy, Radiolab is a show for those people who are fascinated by the intricacies of the world we live in.

Listen Alikes:

99% Invisible

Every Little Thing


Myth and Folklore

Lore

I like to call this “Are You Afraid of the Dark: Adult Edition.” Lore takes true stories that frighten and disturb and turns them into campfire-style tales. Recently made into a TV show as well, it is best if listened to on a long night drive or with the lights dimmed. Fans of The Twilight Zone will appreciate its anthology-style storytelling and the added bonus is that these stories actually happened. Where to start? Ep. 2: The Bloody Pit


History

Revisionist History

Malcolm Gladwell is very likely a familiar name to you from his best-selling books Blink, The Tipping Point, and What the Dog Saw. In Revisionist History, Gladwell takes all the energy and enthusiasm he has for storytelling and applies it to ideas that we think we already understand. His brand of thinking deeply on topics that seem obvious on their surface works especially well in the podcast format. Check out “Hallelujah,” in which Gladwell examines the idea of genius and how it emerges in individuals.

Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

A podcast about the Supreme Court of the United States? Really? Yup. And it’s even better than you could ever imagine. From tales of its inception to the cases being argued today, More Perfect delves deep into the backstories of the people behind the cases and offers an in-depth view on how the court arrives at its decisions. Personal favorites of mine include “Kittens Kick the Giggly Blue Robot All Summer,” which looks at the very early years of the court while it was still finding its place in our system of law and “The Political Thicket,” in which we see just a glimpse of the pressure that serving on the court entails.

Listen Alike:

Stuff You Missed in History Class


Current Issues

Embedded

Embedded reporting is a long-standing tradition within the journalism field, but with Embedded (the podcast), Kelly McEvers takes this to the next level. By focusing in on a story currently in the news and placing herself in the center of the action, McEvers provides a unique type of insight into issues that can seem too big to be ever fully understood. In the gripping episode “The Capital,” McEvers ventures to the murder capital of the world, El Salvador, and spends 24 hours in the capital city, San Salvador, where she witnesses first-hand the gang violence that grips the nation. It’s edge-of-your-seat listening and just one example of an overall stellar body of work. Intrigued? – Check out the entire list of casts.

Listen Alikes:

The Daily

Reveal


Sports

30 for 30

What? Think I forgot about you, sports fans? Never. 30 for 30 will be familiar to you as a fan of sports/watcher of ESPN. The TV show has established itself as the most excellent avenue to the behind-the-scenes (off-the-field?) stories of the athletes we love. The jump to podcast was only natural and has only improved the long-form sports story. Whether it’s the tale of Madden and his videogame domination or the fight to open Wrigleyville up to night games, 30 for 30 is a must-listen for any die-hard fans who seek to know more about their favorite teams/players/sports than what you can get from just watching the main event.

Listen Alike:

The Bill Simmons Podcast


If you like the podcasts featured above, you may also like these great radio programs available at your local library …
NPR driveway moments [spoken CD] : radio stories that won't let you go. Moms
NPR driveway moments for dads [spoken CD]
NPR funniest driveway moments [spoken CD]
NPR driveway moments. Love stories. [spoken CD]

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Allison F. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/podcasts-what-are-they-and-why-should-i-care.

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So You Say You Hate Musicals

Hello blog readers! Allison F and Eric P here to talk to you about something that’s been weighing on us.

So, you say you hate musicals …

Do you really?

Is it the cheesy storylines? Or maybe it’s the way they keep making their characters sing and dance when people don’t really do that. Perhaps they give you a strange, uncomfortable feeling – as if you are embarrassed for the incredibly talented people singing and dancing their hearts out. They look like they’re having the time of their life, but deep down they feel awkward and self-conscious, right? Right?

We get it, musicals are kinda weird. But the thing is, we don’t actually believe you when you say you hate them.

We think maybe you just haven’t discovered the musical that’s right for you.

We think maybe you saw “Fiddler on the Roof” once when you were seven and swore you’d never watch one again. (At an impressionable age, Eric sat through a high school production of “Oklahoma!” in which the title song threatened never to end. It may still be going to this day.)

We think we can convince you otherwise.

So we dare you to keep reading. Let us try and prove to you that musicals are a magical force of fun and excitement just waiting to change your life. Or at least change your mind.

 

Eric says

If you like…

War and peace by Leo Tolstoy
Seekers and finders [music CD] / Gogol Bordello
You're the worst - Television Show, Season 2 on DVD / Bluebrush Productions

 

You’ll probably enjoy

Natasha, Pierre and the great comet of 1812 [music CD] : original Broadway cast recording / Dave Malloy

Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812

The musical where actors play their own guitars and accordions while navigating love and dysfunction during the Napoleonic wars.

Music CD | eMusic

 

Allison says

If you like…

Outlander. Season 1, volume 1 [DVD] / executive producer, Ronald D. Moore
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
Synthesis by Evanescence - music album

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Phantom of the Opera - motion picture

The Phantom of the Opera

In which the female lead never once questions the disembodied voice that is teaching her to sing and willingly allows herself to be kidnapped and taken into the bowels of Paris’s underground before panicking and realizing something might not be quite right with the dude in the mask.

DVDMusic CD | eMusic

 

Eric says

If you like…

Lysis ; Symposium ; Gorgias / Plato ; with an English translation by W.R.M. Lamb
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert - motion picture
The rise and fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars [music CD] / David Bowie

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Hedwig and the angry inch [music CD] : original Broadway cast recording / Music and lyrics by Stephen Trask ; book by John Cameron Mitchell ; directed by Michael Mayer

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

The glammy rock opera about love, identity, and sex reassignment surgery in the shadow of the cold war.

Music CD | eMusic

 

Allison says

If you like…

Role models / John Waters
Save the last dance - motion picture
RuPaul's drag race (Season 7) - television show

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Hairspray - motion picture

Hairspray

The upbeat and colorful tale of some plucky teens who just want to dance and aren’t gonna let a little thing like institutionalized racism get in their way.

DVD | Music CD

 

Eric says

If you like…

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
Marathon Man - motion picture
Wall of sound [music CD] : the very best of Phil Spector, 1961-1966
The Complete houseplant survival manual : essential know-how for keeping (not killing) more than 160 indoor plants / Barbara Pleasant ; photography by Rosemary Kautzky

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Little Shop of Horrors - motion picture

Little Shop of Horrors

In which carnivorous plants and malicious dentists sing catchy Brill Building pop numbers as the bodies pile up.

DVD | eMusic

 

Allison says

If you like…

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Stand by Me - motion picture
The Very Best of Backstreet Boys - music

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Newsies

Newsies

The story of scrappy turn of the century newspaper sales boys who team up with Teddy Roosevelt to take down the newspaper industry. Also, Christian Bale in a cowboy hat.

DVDeMusic

 

Eric says

If you like…

Ripper Street - TV Show
Symphonie fantastique [music CD] / Hector Berlioz
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
The Donner Party [DVD] / written and directed by Ric Burns ; produced by Lisa Ades and Ric Burns

 

You’ll probably enjoy….

Sweeney Todd - motion picture

Sweeney Todd

The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, a darkly Victorian tale of entrepreneurial cannibalism.

DVD | Music CD

 

Allison says

If you like…

Harry Potter and the sorcerer's stone / by J.K. Rowling
Hocus Pocus - motion picture
Charmed - TV Show
Kermit the Frog's "It's Not easy Being Green"
Image by Isotastic – flickr

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Wicked

Wicked

The tale of the “Wicked” Witch of the West who it turns out had a greater handle on things than anyone else and also really knew how to rock the all-black look.

Music CD | eMusic
Based on the novel “Wicked” by Gregory Maguire.

 

Eric says

If you like…

Lawrence of Arabia - motion picture
Northern Exposure - TV Show
Omar Sharif - 1963
Photo by Gene Weber – Wikimedia Commons

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

The Band’s Visit

The intimate and heartbreaking show about cosmopolitan Egyptian musicians unexpectedly stranded in a small Israeli desert town.

Music CD | eMusic
Book | eBook
Based on the film by Eran Kolirin.

 

Allison says

If you like…

Antiques Roadshow behind the scenes : an insider's guide to PBS's #1 weekly show / Marsha Bemko
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

 

The Fugitive - motion picture

 

You’ll probably enjoy…

Les Miserables - motion picture

Les Miserables

In which everyone is truly miserable except for two young lovebirds whose self-absorption is so intense they are able to all but ignore the French Revolution. Plus, ghosts.

DVDMusic CD

 

…Did it work? Is your previous antipathy toward musicals dwindling like the box office returns of “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark?” Do you feel a newfound generosity toward the art form swelling in you like the crescendo of an 11 o’clock number?

Or perhaps your indifference remains unchanged. Maybe you still feel as antagonistic toward the stage musical experience as Leslie Odom Jr’s Aaron Burr felt toward Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Alexander Hamilton.”

But that’s okay. It just means we haven’t found the right one for you yet. We’ll be back with another blog post with more suggestions, and we’ll keep coming back until you’ve got jazz hands.

I mean, that high school performance of “Oklahoma!” is still going on somewhere, so anything’s possible.

Five-six-seven-eight!

 

Read more from Eric and Allison


 

Looking for your next great read?

Let us help you!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

toledolibrary.org/Give3Get!
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Art Students Prepare for Black History Month

Coming in early February, students from the Toledo School for the Arts will kick off Black History Month with a concert at the Main Library. These students are planning a musical collaboration with the Toledo Lucas County Public Library and retired BGSU professor, Michael Peslikis.

TSA students rehearsing for Black History Month music concert.

What started off as a school project, has quickly grown into something more. The high school students take time out of their busy schedules once a week to prepare their performance. They meet every Monday, sometimes with Dr. Peslikis, to rehearse and explore black history through musical interactions. Even with so few rehearsals, much progress and individual discovery has taken place. During rehearsals, young musicians delve into the rich history of African American music, sharpening their skills along the way, while learning more about black history.

Toledo School for the Arts rehearsing for music concert.

From 1800’s parlor songs to the blues, a wide range of music will be featured in the February program, and they are already looking forward to the performance. It will be a vibrant showcase of some of the country’s most influential songs, as well as other tunes, which may not be as familiar to the average listener.

The concert will be held at the Main Library (February 2018). Admission is free and the concert is open to the public. We hope you’re just as excited as we are. See you at our Black History Month celebration in February!

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