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Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Explore the Universe with a Telescope from the Library!

Telescope Kits

Have you heard about our telescope kits?

Interested in borrowing a telescope kit? Here are a few helpful details:

Kit Contents

Included in the telescope kit is the Orion Star Blast telescope, with a 4.5″ aperture and fast f/4 focal ratio which provides detailed views of solar system targets such as the Moon and planets. With the Orion Star Blast telescope, it’s also possible to view celestial objects like nebulas and star clusters, and the telescope can be assembled in a few minutes. This is a great compact telescope designed for beginner level astronomy enthusiasts. The kit also includes:

  • Two Explorer II 1.25″ Kellner telescope eyepieces (17mm and 6mm)
  • EZ Finder II reflex sight for easy aiming
  • Eyepiece rack
  • Collimation cap
  • Starry Night astronomy software
  • Carrying case

Reserving a Kit

Reservations can be made by contacting one of the following branch locations:

  • Kent
  • King Road
  • Oregon
  • Point Place
  • Sanger
  • Sylvania
  • West Toledo

Borrowing a Kit

  • Loanable for 7 days
  • Can be renewed twice
  • Check out with adult or juvenile library card
  • Must be checked out and returned to the same location during library hours (do not place in dropbox).

The Orion Star Blast telescope kits make it possible explore the universe from your own backyard.

The telescopes were generously donated by the Toledo Astronomical Association.

Astronomy, Stargazing and Telescopes .. Oh My!

Books for Kids
Star finder! : a step-by-step guide to the night sky / foreword by Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock ; editor, Sarah MacLeod
Night sky / Stephanie Warren Drimmer - National Geographic Kids book from 2017
Stars and galaxies / by James Buckley, Jr
Looking up! : the science of stargazing / by meteorologist Joe Rao ; illustrated by Mark Borgions
What we see in the stars : an illustrated tour of the night sky / Kelsey Oseid
Astronomy for Kids: 26 Family-friendly Activities about Stars, Planets, and Observing the World Around You by Michelle Nichols - eBook
Stargazing by Alex Kuskowski - eBook
Discovering the universe / Giles Sparrow

Books for Adults

Astronomy : a visual guide / Ian Ridpath ; additional contributors, Giles Sparrow and Carole Stott - DK book from 2018
The New Astronomy Guide: Stargazing in the Digital Age by Patrick Moore
Complete Guide to Stargazing by Robin Scagell
The Astronomy Book - contributors, David W. Hughes, Robert Dinwiddie, Penny Johnson, and Tom Jackson (DK Publishing)
The Stars: The Definitive Visual Guide to the Cosmos by Robert Dinwiddie, David W. Hughes, Geraint Jones, Ian Ridpath, Carole Stott, and Giles Sparrow; Consultant, Jacqueline Mitton (DK Publishing)
Eyes on the Sky: A Spectrum of Telescopes by Francis Graham-Smith
101 Objects to See in the Night Sky by Robin Scagell
Stargazing Basics: Getting Started in Recreational Astronomy by Paul E. Kinzer

Related Astronomy Websites

How to Enjoy Your New Telescope: Advice for Beginner Skywatchers – Space.com

How to Use A Telescope: 16 Essential Steps to Loving the Night Sky – Love the Night Sky

Seeing and Transparency Guide – The Astronomical League

Orion Star Blast Telescope Review and Summary – Astronomy.com

Orion StarBlast 4.5 Astro Reflector Telescope – Telescope.com


Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Amber B. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/explore-the-universe-with-a-telescope-kit-from-your-local-library.

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Lights, Camera, Action! GoPro Camera Kits at Toledo Library

The GoPro action camera has become very popular because it’s fun and easy to use; it produces high quality photos and movies; and it’s versatile. It’s known as an action camera because it’s often used to film action scenes outdoors, it’s waterproof, and it’s sturdy. It can be used to create short films, to develop stop motion animation, make underwater videos, or take high quality vacation photos. The possibilities are endless, and getting started is as simple as going to the library.

The Toledo Lucas County Public Library has two types of GoPro kits that can be checked out for one week and renewed twice. The GoPro basic kit is available for customers of all ages at the Oregon Branch Library, and contains a GoPro Hero entry level action camera, case, straps, camera housing, microcard, cables, and adapters. The GoPro deluxe kit is available for adult customers only at the King Road Branch Library, and contains a GoPro Hero4 action camera, case, straps, camera housing, microcard, cables, and adapters.

GoPro kits must be checked out and returned to the same library location (inside the building during library hours – do not place this material in the drop box). Talk to a staff member today at Oregon or King Road Branch to reserve the GoPro kit of your choice.

Want to learn more about the GoPro Camera?

Check out these great GoPro Books

GoPro for Dummies by John Carucci (c.2017)
How To Use The GoPro HERO 4 Black: The Book For Your Camera by Jordon Hetrick
My GoPro Hero5 Camera by Jason R. Rich
GoPro : professional guide to filmmaking / Bradford Schmidt, Brandon Thompson

Cinematography / Filmmaking Books

Cinematography by Mike Goodridge and Tim Grierson
The Lego Animation Book: make your own LEGO movies! by David Pagano and David Pickett
How To Make Movies: Low-Budget/No-Budget Indie Experts Tell All by Kevin J. Lindenmuth
The Digital filmmaking handbook: the definitive guide to digital filmmaking by Mark Brindle
Or check out these websites for fun ideas on how to get creative with the GoPro camera:

What is GoPro? – My Gadgets

Put Your GoPro Camera to the Test with These Creative Ideas – MUO (Make Use Of)

8 Creative Things To Do With a GoPro At Home – Amateur Photographer

13 GoPro Tips for Families – ClickLikeThis

How-To: 3 Most Popular DIY GoPro Projects – Make Magazine

11 Coolest Places to Take Your GoPro – Mashable

GoPro Session: Everything You Need to Know – Outside Magazine

How to Edit GoPro Videos – Udemy

GoPro 3D Prints You’ll Love: 11 Best GoPro Accessories to 3D Print – All3DP

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Amber B. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/lights-camera-action–gopro-video-camera-kits-from-your-local-library.

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Building Great Learners Starts With Reading

“Too early” has no place in the formula when it comes to gauging the right time to begin nurturing children’s interest in reading. While introducing her daughter Aria to the wonder of words, Renee O’Brien found out how quickly that awareness and appreciation of books and language can be ignited.

O’Brien had heard about the Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s Ready to Read program and decided not long after the birth of her first child to get some advice on preparing Aria to be a lifelong reader.

“I wanted to make sure she has the tools she needs in life to be a good reader, and a good learner,” O’Brien said. “So I went to the library, talked to the people there and got the information on what to do. I found out that even at a very young age, it is important to read to her and let her hear a variety of words.”

Ready to Read stresses how critical the years before kindergarten are for the development of children’s reading ability, and how the language and word skills a child is exposed to during that time period will play a significant role in how successful that child will be in school, and in life. The program promotes five activities that parents can do with their children to greatly improve their success: talking, singing, reading, writing and playing.

Talk Sing Read Write Play

Ready to Read encourages parents and childcare providers to frequently talk with children in order to help them learn new words and to stimulate brain development. Singing improves a child’s capability to understand sounds within words, while reading together helps children become skilled readers. Parents are also urged to write out words to give children an understanding of letters and how they form sounds. Time for play is likewise important, as this is one of the main ways that children learn about the world.

O’Brien and her husband Kevin started introducing Aria to books when she was just four months old, and followed a plan that included frequently talking, singing and reading to her while she was in her high chair.

“At first, she paid no attention to us,” O’Brien said, “but they encouraged us to keep doing it.”

Then, somewhat magically and whimsically, Aria’s eyes lit up and the pathway for the 17-month-old to become a lifelong reader was wide open.

“Now, over the past three months she has been so interested in books,” O’Brien said. “Her doctor is very impressed with her development. She brings us the books and says: ‘read, read.’ She loves the books with pictures and words like ball and banana and gets excited when we read to her.”

Since its inception in April 2014, the Ready to Read program has provided more than 4,000 parents and childcare providers with free kits and training. In 2017, the program reached more than 6,000 parents and children. 600 families received in-depth training and a free preschool or kindergarten resource kit while another 800 received tools and tips such as the Busy Book and Kindergarten Skill Rings.

Ready to Read helped 4000 parents and 10000 children

Planting the Seed to Read

Statistics show that when they enter kindergarten, nearly two-thirds of area students do not have the fundamental skills needed to learn how to read and write. With $2 million in support from donors, the Library’s “Planting a Seed to Read” campaign was developed to address this deficiency. It is part of the Library’s overall Early Literacy Campaign which has the ambitious goal of improving the essential literacy skills of every child in the community.

“We know that in Lucas County, a lot of children are not arriving at school ready to learn and read, and that’s a big concern,” said Nancy Eames, youth services coordinator at the Library.

“One of the ways we address that is to show parents how to teach their children so those children are ready to read when they start school. Most kids won’t start reading until they are five or six, but they need a good foundation in place well before that age.”

She added that with locations in every corner of the community, the Library is able to offer support to families and get children started on building a foundation in reading.

“Parents are children’s first teachers, so their role is very important,” Eames said. “We want them talking to their children, which helps build vocabulary. Engaging in conversations that expand their world knowledge is also very valuable. Children can gain a lot when parents sing to them, since singing slows down the words and lets the child hear the syllables.”

Eames said that parents should continually expand on what they are saying so children hear a wide variety of words. When they start to read, children will more easily recognize words they have heard before.

“What we all need to do is put down our devices, and help kids build vocabulary,” Eames said. “Vocabulary is a skill we build throughout our entire lives, and the earlier we start, the more successful we will be.”

Intensive Storytimes Make Learning Fun

The Library’s “Intensive Storytimes” program is on the same mission – to increase children’s interest in books and reading, while strengthening their pre-literacy skills. Intensive Storytimes were first introduced in the fall of 2013 to eight Toledo Public Schools (TPS) Kindergarten classes and today, now serves about 40 TPS Kindergarten classes and 600 to 700 students annually.

The program also introduces students to their neighborhood Library, through the work of children’s librarians who visit the schools to present traditional storytime elements, such as reading books aloud, teaching rhyming words and singing with the children. These are facets of the dialogic reading technique which has been shown to hasten the development of early literacy aptitude, including oral language skills.

A librarian reading during Storytime

A Teacher Approved Approach

Fadia Olrich has been teaching Kindergarten for eight years, and she said her Riverside Elementary students are very excited when Children’s Librarian Maria Royuela-Tomas makes her regular visits to the classroom. Olrich said the librarians in the program work with teachers and develop themes for each week, often linking them to topics covered during the rest of the school day.

“Maria always has props or puppet shows or something that ties into the story and keeps the kids engaged the whole time,” Olrich said. “She focuses on vocabulary and character identification and my kids are always eager to participate – their hands are in the air to ask or answer questions.”

Olrich said the Intensive StoryTimes program is critically important for her students, many of whom have not been introduced to books before attending Kindergarten.

“A lot of my students aren’t even exposed to reading before they arrive here. Some had no idea what a library is, and they can’t believe it’s a place where you can go and get books,” she said. “So this program is very beneficial.”

Jim Funk, manager of institutional and community initiatives at the Library, said the goal of the Intensive StoryTimes program and the overall early literacy efforts is to have children properly prepared to learn.

“At first, we only worked with adults on improving literacy, but we realized working with children is the key to a better life for them, and for society,” he said. “The task is daunting, since so many of the children come to school not sufficiently prepared to read, but we aspire to do anything we can to help.”

The response to those efforts has been overwhelmingly positive.

All of the TPS teachers surveyed concluded that Intensive StoryTimes exposed their students to experiences that increased their pre-literacy skills. The teachers were also unanimous in their opinion that Intensive StoryTimes amplified the interest in reading in their classrooms, and helped the students build reading skills. The teachers all wanted Intensive StoryTimes to return to their classrooms.

“That’s very gratifying, because there are many different types of intervention underway, but the fact that teachers want our program back every year is a real testimony to its effectiveness,” Funk said.

A father reading to his son

Get In on the Early Literacy Action

Parents and childcare providers who have more questions or would like to request a free training may call 419.259.5253 or email readytoread@toledolibrary.org.

To support the Library’s Early Literacy Campaign, contact the Library Legacy Foundation at 419.259.5123 or email kathy.selking@toledolibrary.org.

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Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

Ever wonder about your ancestors from Ireland, when they came here, if they came here and what they did when they got here?

Paul Milner has your answers.

Paul Milner is a professional genealogist and internationally known lecturer with 30 years’ experience, specializing in British Isles research.

 

This internationally known professional genealogist is coming to the Toledo Lucas County Public Library to help answer these and other questions regarding Irish Genealogy. Mr. Milner is a native of northern England and has been designing genealogy workshops, writing books, and lecturing for more than 35 years. He is the 2018 recipient of the Utah Genealocial Society Fellow Award.

Event Information

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018 | 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Maumee Branch Library
This is an all-day free event with a lunch break. Feel free to bring a lunch or dine at one of the nearby restaurants in Maumee.

Program highlights include:

  • An overview of the research process
  • Exploring land records to delve deeper
  • Using maps as a tool

In the meantime, why not pick up one (or more) of these books on Irish genealogy …

Irish Genealogy Guidebooks

The Family Tree Irish genealogy guide : how to trace your ancestors in Ireland / Claire Santry
Tracing your Irish ancestors : the complete guide / John Grenham
Tracing your Irish & British roots / W. Daniel Quillen
A Genealogist's Guide To Discovering Your Irish Ancestors by Dwight A. Radford, Kyle J. Betit

Or visit these websites …

Online Resources for Tracing Your Irish Roots

Irish Genealogy.ie

Irish Genealogy Toolkit

FamilySearch


For more information, or to register for this event, call the Local History and Genealogy Department at 419-259-5233.

Originally posted by Jill C. at ToledoLibrary.org/Tracing-Your-Irish-Ancestors

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Join us for Poetry Speaks! African American Read-In, Feb. 14

Poetry Speaks! African American Poetry Read-in

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 | 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. | Main Library – McMaster Center

African Americans have profoundly influenced American poetry, from Phillis Wheatley to Paul Lawrence Dunbar, through the poets of the Harlem Renaissance, and into this twenty-first century explosion of brilliant new poets.

In celebration, we’re asking people in our community to choose one favorite poem or excerpt by an African American poet to read in a staged reading emceed by Rhonda Sewell, Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s External and Governmental Affairs Manager, and to tell us a bit about what it means to them.

Register to read a favorite poem (not your own, but published), family friendly, and no longer than a 5 minute time slot.  Registration is required only to read.

Online Registration for Readers opens January 15, 2018 and closes February 7, 2018.

Everyone is invited to attend.


Looking for a poem to read at the event? Check out these notable selections.

The Complete poetry by Maya Angelou
Selected poems by Gwendolyn Brooks
Complete poems / James Weldon Johnson ; edited with an introduction by Sondra Kathryn Wilson
Olio by Tyehimba Jess
Heaven / Rowan Ricardo Phillips
SOS: Poems 1961-2013 by Amiri Baraka
Don't Call Us Dead : Poems by Danez Smith
Collected poems : 1974--2004 / Rita Dove
Use trouble : poems / by Michael S. Harper
The collected poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 / edited by Kevin Young and Michael S. Glaser ; foreword by Toni Morrison ; afterword by Kevin Young
The Collected poems of Langston Hughes / Arnold Rampersad, editor, David Roessel, associate editor
Wild beauty = Belleza salvaje : new and selected poems / Ntozake Shange ; translated by Alejandro Álvarez Nieves
Looking for online sources? Check these out:

Black History Month – Academy of American Poets
To celebrate Black History Month in February—and the rich tradition of African American poetry all year long—browse essays on literary milestones and movements, find important books on black history and poetics, look for lesson plans for Black History Month, read archival letters from classic African American poets, and search poems about the African American experience by both classic and contemporary poets.

Celebrating Black History Month – Poetry Foundation
Poems, articles, and podcasts that explore African American history and culture.

University of Pittsburg Center for African American Poets and Poetics
The mission of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics (CAAPP) at the University of Pittsburgh is to highlight, promote, and share the poetry and poetic work of African American and African diasporic writers.

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Two Librarians, Too Many Books: It’s Women’s History Month, Y’all!

In an effort to jazz up the typical readers’ advisory list that us bloggers usually find ourselves writing, we decided sit down and have a conversation as stereotypical librarians who don’t-know-how-to-shut-up-about-books-already. Our hope is that you might find value in the fact that our noses rarely venture more than twelve inches from the page or that maybe our ramblings might aid your book search process, even if just a little.

Please enjoy our first installment of …

Two Librarians, Too Many Books


Allison Fiscus: Hey there, I’m Allison and I’m a librarian and manager of the Maumee Branch and I absolutely hate reading. Kidding. I practically live in a house made of books.

Katie Midgley: Hey! I’m Katie and I’m a former children’s librarian and the current assistant manager of the Sanger Branch and I promise I have more to recommend than true crime.

A: Katie, it’s not nice to lie to our readers when they barely know us.

K: So sorry. It won’t happen again.

A: I make no such promises.

It’s Women’s History Month, y’all! I, for one, can’t think of a worthier topic to chat endlessly about. So in celebration, Katie and I decided to get together to talk about the female authors who have captivated us through the written word and inspired us in our own lives. The following conversation is a lightly-edited-for-clarity transcription of our chat. You ready?

K: Where should we start?


Children’s Lit

A: I’ve always thought that the work of female children’s book authors can be some of the most poignant. When I think of the books that left a lasting effect on me, I usually think of the prolific female authors of my childhood. Judy Blume, Sharon Creech and Beverly Cleary always come to mind, mostly because they really knew how to write a story that found a way to express the particular frustrations of being a kid without venturing into a space that condescends. I’ll never forget finishing “Walk Two Moons” for the first of many times and racing to my mom and INSISTING that she read it.

K: Raina Telgemeier is a modern-day example of that. I love all her stuff, but “Smile” does a great job of capturing what it’s like to be a self-conscious kid trying to find your identity amidst a crisis.

A: Same with Rebecca Stead and in particular the book “When You Reach Me.” I’m convinced that talking about how this is the perfect book for any kid is what landed me my first Children’s Librarian job.

K: Yeah right, it was totally your hair.

A: 90% book, 10% hair. For real though, “When You Reach Me” is a magic book. Short, but full of depth, magical in some respects but also serious. Plus, its emphasis on another of my favorite stories – “A Wrinkle in Time” – practically guarantees that any kid who reads it will want to read that too. Not to mention the story is pure genius. I read it as an adult and it genuinely kept me guessing until the end, so I just know that any kid who reads it will experience one of those magical reading moments that takes your breath away and leaves you in awe.

K: Speaking of authors who write stories that leave you in awe, Katherine Applegate! I love her. I thought she couldn’t get any better after, “The One and Only Ivan,” but then she went and wrote “Wishtree.” It’s told from the perspective of a tree watching over the home of a refugee family new to the neighborhood. She really conquers tough topics in her children’s fiction.

A: I also have to mention the OG author of my childhood, Louisa May Alcott. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read “Little Women” and how mad I get every time a certain decision is made by a certain main character (you know who/what I mean…).

K: Do I? I’ve only seen the movie…I might be the worst librarian ever.

A: That’s my sick day movie! Total classic. I love the way the March sisters always had each other’s backs. I think it’s a story women of all ages can relate to and learn from to this day.

 

Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
Smile by Raina Telgemeier
When you reach me by Rebecca Stead
The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
Wishtree by Katherine Applegate
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Memoirs and Essays

K:  Memoirs are the best. I love being able to crawl into someone’s head for a few hours. Makes me feel like I’ve lived a thousand lives.

A: I love that they make me feel like I’m getting to know someone who I’ve admired from afar.

K: I have to start with “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed. Strayed chronicles her time as a 26 year old woman using her grief and problems with addiction as motivation to hike the Pacific Crest Trail on a quest for healing. THE BOOK IS SO MUCH BETTER THAN THE MOVIE, FYI. No offense to Reese Witherspoon.

A: “Wild” felt to me like a story that was going to be tough to read but that I needed to get through. Required reading for the soul. It was gripping, and moving, and somehow awful and beautiful all at once. I’ve since read Strayed’s “Tiny, Beautiful Things” which is a collection of advice she gave during her time writing the “Dear Sugar” advice column. She’s incredibly wise.

I also need to shout out to the funniest woman of the last century, Tina Fey. This might sound crazy but her memoir “Bossypants” has some of the best career advice I’ve ever read. I’ve used it many times over the years and it never fails.

K: That doesn’t sound crazy, inspiration comes from the most random places. A recent read for me is “Muslim Girl” by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh. I wish her book becomes required reading for high school students everywhere. She describes what it’s like to be Muslim in post 9-11 America and somehow manages to do so with both humor and grace. Total icon!

A:We Should All Be Feminists” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is number one on my required reading list for teenage girls. Adichie has a way of presenting ideas that are for some reason controversial in a way that seems like simple common sense. I love that she can make light of what she clearly feels passionately about which in turn makes others more understanding of what she’s saying.

K: I’m a big fan of another of her books, “Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions.” It’s my go-to gift for every baby shower because it’s a practical outline for how to raise a feminist.

A: I love when she talks about how she went around calling herself a “Happy African Feminist Who Does Not Hate Men And Who Likes To Wear Lip Gloss And High Heels For Herself And Not For Men” because every time someone would tell her she shouldn’t or couldn’t do or like something it was because they believed it to be antithetical to feminism. I still laugh every time I read that because it’s so on point with what it’s like to be a female in our world today.

Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed
Bossypants by Tina Fey
Muslim Girl: A Coming of Age by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh
We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Dear Ijeawele : or a feminist manifesto in fifteen suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Fiction

A: I’m going to try extremely hard to keep this list limited to my absolute favorites. All 238 of them.

K:  Don’t hate me but I probably only read a handful of adult fiction books a year…

A: Rude.

K: My recent fav is “The First Bad Man” by Miranda July. What if your boss had a moody millennial daughter and you were pressured into letting that daughter move in with you? Crazy right?

A: You can’t move in with me.

K: Weird, you and I are both bosses AND millennial daughters…

A: True, plus I’d let you move in with me in a heartbeat. I could steal all your clothes.

K: You can’t have my boots.

A: Dang…

K: Miranda July is a creative genius and she weaves this bizarre premise into one of my favorite love stories of all time, just be prepared to embrace the weirdness.

A: I have a strang one, too! “Euphoria” by Lily King. It’s actually a Kirkus Prize winner that somehow has flown under the radar. You would love it because it’s (very, very) loosely based on the life of Margaret Mead – with quite a few sensationalized details added in of course.

K: You’re going to be so proud of me…I read my first ever science fiction book. “The Power” by Naomi Alderman.

A: I am proud. Though I’ll be more proud when your reaction to a picture of Princess Leia isn’t “Who’s that again?”

K: Hey, I know about the gold bikini!

A: *Looks to the sky* I’m sorry Carrie Fisher. I’ve failed you.

K: So imagine a world where girls are able to produce electricity from their fingertips at the age of 14 and can transfer this ability with just a touch to any other woman on the planet. Chaos ensues, and a matriarchy emerges. It’s amazing.

A: I’m in.

K: I knew you would be.

A: My sci-fi/fantasy pro-matriarchy book of choice is “Queen of the Tearling” by Erika Johansen. I like to describe it as the politics of “Game of Thrones” mixed up with female empowerment of “The Hunger Games” minus the dominant romance story lines that similar books can’t seem to get away from. Plus, the series features a serious plot-twist that I definitely didn’t see coming.

K: Sounds interesting. I love anything that strays away from typical romance.

A: Don’t worry, I’ll force you to read it soon enough.

K: I swear I need a separate GoodReads list just for your suggestions, dude.

A: Best get on that, Midgley. I have so many amazing books that I want to talk about in this category. I think I should probably just do it lightning-round style.

K: Go.

A: “The Red Garden” by Alice Hoffman for anyone who loves magical realism and historical fiction.

The Tiger’s Wife” by Téa Obreht for an example of a truly original and enthralling story that will keep you guessing through to the end.

The Fifth Season” by N.K. Jemisin for one of the best recent sci-fi reads I have had in a very long time.

Career of Evil” by Robert Galbraith (cough* J.K. Rowling *cough) for all you mystery/detective story lovers who appreciate a great whodunit.

The Historian” by Elizabeth Kostova for a truly well-written vampire story.

And last but not least, “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern because outside of Harry Potter, this is my absolute favorite book of all time. For a real treat, listen to the audiobook.

K: You good now?

A: I think so. What’s next?

The First Bad Man: A Novel by Miranda July
Euphoria by Lily King
The Power by Naomi Alderman
The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen
The Tiger's Wife by Tea Obreht
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Poetry

K: I’m going to call myself out here. I’d never read a poetry book until Rupi Kaur.

A: The last poetry book I read was by Shel Silverstein and I’m pretty sure that was in the third grade. I don’t think you have any reason to feel shame.

K: Now I’m judging you.

A: Totally fair.

K: A friend recommended Kaur’s first book, “Milk and Honey,” to me and I read all 204 pages on a flight to Texas. When I landed two hours later, I had puffy eyes and I have to assume the entire plane was wondering what in God’s name was wrong with me.

A: People think that of me after a plane ride without the puffy eyes or poetry. I may or may not be a nervous flyer.

K: FLYING IS SAFER THAN DRIVING! Here’s one of my favorites, perfectly appropriate for Women’s History Month:

In the spirit of intl women’s day
A post shared by rupi kaur (@rupikaur_) on Mar 7, 2014 at 1:54pm PST

 

A: That’s a beautiful piece of poetry.

K: Do yourself a favor and sit down with both of her books and absorb them all in one sitting. You’ll feel things.

A: I don’t know – it’s hard to beat the poem that follows “Sister for Sale“… I kid. Shel Silverstein is a treasure.

K: I have one more shout out to give here. Jacqueline Woodson is my literary hero. Force the book “Brown Girl Dreaming” into the hands of any child in your life, please. Poetry isn’t her usual medium but she’ll have you thinking otherwise with this book. She writes about the civil rights movement from her childhood perspective, and it’ll break your heart.

 

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur
The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur
Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Nonfiction

A: Now let me tell you about my home girl Sarah Vowell.

K: Your home girl?

A: Oh yes. I met her once and told her I loved her and had read everything she’s ever written. We’re best friends now.

K: You’ve met everyone. Remember Gloria Steinem? Still haven’t forgiven you for that.

A: Best day of my life, dude. So Sarah Vowell writes mainly American history books from the perspective of a sarcastic, irreverent, mildly-macabre and above all amusing stance.

K: My mom listens to all her stuff on audio. You’ve heard her voice, right? It’s so original.

A: She’s the voice of Violet Incredible. Her dulcet tones are a staple in my house. She’s openly obsessed with death, too, so you’d love her. Her book “Assassination Vacation” is a road trip of all the prominent locations involved in presidential assassinations. It’s very uplifting.

K: Books about death? You know I can never get enough. One of the best is “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” by Caitlin Doughty. I really want to be friends with this author. She took a job at a crematory in LA in her twenties and this book details her day to day life working with the dead.

A: Wait! I think I know her from her column “Ask a Mortician.”

K: YES. She actually ended up starting her own business which offers an eco-friendly burial option (gotta love California). She also created a YouTube channel where she answers people’s questions about death, which is both informative and hilarious.

Now I need to tell you about “Radium Girls.”

A: You’ve tried this before. I don’t know if I can take it, but give me your best pitch.

K: So, in the early 1920s, one of the chicest jobs a woman could get was painting radium dials. The girls would dip the paintbrush into their mouth after each brushstroke to create a fine tip, so they were ingesting a ton of radium… they’d even paint their teeth with radium before a date so they could have a glowing smile. Anyway, you and I both know this ends disastrously. The book outlines, in HEART WRENCHING DETAIL, the swift decline in health of these women, and the lawsuit that follows. Honestly this story is not for the squeamish. Let me just say you’ll really value your own teeth after reading this.

A: *Touches teeth and cringes* – I think I can say with complete certainty that I’m gonna pass on that one. Have you read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks?”

K: Didn’t they make an HBO special out of this book, with Oprah!?

A: YES. And I will never forgive the various award-givers for not honoring her amazing performance. The story is completely moving and heartbreaking and important. It really puts into perspective the things we take for granted when it comes to medicine and healthcare. And both Henrietta’s story and the way the Lacks family continues to be mistreated by the medical community is really eye-opening.

Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women by Kate Moore
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Teen

A: So, I don’t particularly love teen fiction as a genre but when I find something I like, I usually really like it.

K: I’ve been challenging myself to read one teen book a week this month. It’s helped me discover some real gems.

A: That’s seriously impressive. I’m averaging about two a year.

K: Well, tell me about one of those…two.

A:Code Name Verity” by Elizabeth Wein. This-book-has-everything! It’s suspenseful and extremely clever and I guarantee you won’t be able to put it down. It’s primarily about the power of female friendship and it takes place in England during WWII. Wein was really thorough about her historical accuracy, too, which was one of the most fascinating aspects for me.

K: I feel like I’m the only person in the world who can’t get into historical fiction.

A: It’s hit or miss for me, but Verity is an extremely good read. I can’t tell you anymore without ruining the story, so you’ll just have to take me at my word. It’s great for book clubs of all ages, too.

K: I recently discovered “Distance From Me to You,” about a girl who defers her college acceptance to hike the Appalachian Trail alone, despite having no experience in the wilderness (FYI: TERRIBLE IDEA.). She meets an endearing guy along the way, and due to some quite stupid decisions on his part, they end up off trail. Teen girls need to read this and realize they don’t need men to accomplish their goals, and that sometimes romance actually weighs you down.

A: PREACH.

K: I also just read and loved “The Hate U Give.” Angie Thomas CLEANED UP at the Youth Media Awards with this book, and rightfully so. The book explores racism and police violence and is a necessary read for any teen exploring the Black Lives Matter movement. They’re also turning this into a movie and the cast is perfection (ISSA RAE!)

 

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
The Distance from Me to You by Marina Gessner (book)
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Graphic Novels

K: Okay, I’m obsessed with graphic novels. They appeal to art lovers as well as story lovers, plus art has the ability to convey emotions that words simply can’t.

A: I couldn’t agree more.

K: I think that a lot of the time when we read we rely on our imaginations for our visual representation of the story, and graphic novels take some of that work away while adding another means of connecting with the author’s perspective. One of my recent favorites is “Honor Girl” by Maggie Thrash, about a girl finding love at summer camp. I recommend this book to every millennial woman looking for a quick summer read. If you’re a child of the 90s, the nostalgia you’ll experience from these pages might have you champing at the bit to be a camp counselor somewhere this summer.

A: I can’t discuss graphic novels without talking about the amazing Marjane Satrapi. Her graphic memoir “Persepolis” taught me more about the culture and conflicts of Iranians than any textbook ever has. Satrapi’s family was deeply involved in the changes that occurred in Iran during her childhood and through her eyes and artistic talent, you really gain insight into what it’s like to grow up in a time of conflict.

K: She also wrote “Embroideries” which has a completely different feel than “Persepolis.”  I love it because it is at its heart an exploration of life as a woman in Iran, but the way it’s presented – through a gossip session with the author’s grandma, mom, and aunts – is totally relatable to any woman who has sat down with a group of females and a bottle of wine on a Friday night. It really made me wish I had a bigger family.

 

Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash
The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
Embroideries by Majane Satrapi

A: Alright Midgley, we’ve gone through all the major genres and rambled on for probably far too long. Do you think anyone is still here?

K: Probably just my mom.

A: Hi Katie’s Mom! Thanks for reading! If you (or any other devoted blog readers) want more recommendations like these, don’t hesitate to reach out. You can also get personalized recommendations from a TLCPL librarian from our Give 3, Get 3 service.

K: We’ll also be back soon with our next installment of Two Librarians, Too Many Books where we’ll talk about our favorite summer reads. Be sure to subscribe to the blog emails before you run off to read all the books we’ve listed if you don’t want to miss it.

A: Thanks, everyone! Happy Women’s History Month!


Read more by Allison and Katie.


Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Allison F. at:

ToledoLibrary.org/blog/Two-librarians-too-many-books-its-womens-history-month-yall

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Reading is My Business, And Business is Good!

There are so many great business and leadership books out recently that appeal to even the most un-business-y readers! Take a look…

Business, Entrepreneurship and Industry

Valley of genius : the uncensored history of Silicon Valley, as told by the hackers, founders, and freaks who made it boom / Adam Fisher
Wisdom @ work : the making of a modern elder / Chip Conley
Fins : Harley Earl, the rise of General Motors, and the glory days of Detroit / William Knoedelseder

Valley of Genius: the Uncensored History of Silicon Valley, as Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made it Boom by Adam Fisher

Lively, fascinating, and educational, sometimes a book sneaks up on readers, prompting us to realize that its topic is a lot more interesting than we might have thought. This is an oral history of Silicon Valley and the rock-star legends in the industry, told by the people who were there from the beginning.

Wisdom at Work: the Making of a Modern Elder by Chip Conley

Experience is making a comeback. At age 52, newly retired hotelier CEO Chip Conley received a call from the young founders of Airbnb, asking him to help grow their start-up into a global hospitality giant. He had the industry experience, but Conley was lacking in the digital fluency of his 20-something colleagues. Roughly twice the age of the average Airbnb employee and reporting to a CEO young enough to be his son, Conley quickly discovered that while he’d been hired as a teacher and mentor, he was also in many ways a student and intern. What emerged is the secret to thriving as a mid-life worker: learning to marry wisdom and experience with curiosity, a beginner’s mind, and a willingness to evolve, all hallmarks of the “Modern Elder.”

Fins: Harley Earl, the Rise of General Motors, and the Glory Days of Detroit by William Knoedelseder

Chronicles the birth and rise to greatness of the American auto industry through the remarkable life of Harley Earl, an eccentric six-foot-five, stuttering visionary who dropped out of college and went on to invent the profession of automobile styling, thereby revolutionized the way cars were made, marketed, and even imagined. His impact was profound. When he retired as GM’s VP of Styling in 1958, Detroit reigned as the manufacturing capitol of the world and General Motors ranked as the most successful company in the history of business.

Billion dollar whale : the man who fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the world / Tom Wright and Bradley Hope
Dear founder : letters of advice for anyone who leads, manages, or wants to start a business / Maynard Webb
Crashed : how a decade of financial crises changed the world / Adam Tooze

Billion Dollar Whale: the Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World by Bradley Hope and Tom Wright

True-story thriller about a man who managed to swindle over $5 billion with the aid of Goldman Sachs and others that exposes the secret nexus of elite wealth, banking, Hollywood, and politics from two award-winning Wall Street Journal reporters. In 2009, with the dust yet to settle on the housing bubble financial crisis, a seemingly mild-mannered Wharton grad began setting in motion a fraud of unprecedented gall and magnitude–one that would come to symbolize the next great threat to the global financial system. An epic true-tale of hubris and greed, Billion Dollar Whale reveals how this young social climber pulled off one of the biggest heists in history–right under the nose of the global financial industry.

Dear Founder: Letters of Advice for Anyone Who Leads, Manages, or Wants to Start a Business by Maynard Webb

Wise, practical, and profitable letters to entrepreneurs, leaders, managers, and business owners in every field—from a leading executive, investor, and business founder. More than 600,000 new businesses are launched each year. How does an entrepreneur build and manage a workplace—and create a lasting legacy? Maynard Webb has helped found, fund, and grow dozens of successful companies, and has driven strategic change at Salesforce, eBay, Everwise, and Visa, among other worldwide corporations. Known for offering savvy insight, encouragement, and a dose of reality in the form of engaging personal letters to a select group of business leaders, Webb now shares his lessons with the rest of America’s aspiring entrepreneurs—at any age and stage in their careers.

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crisis Changed the World by Adam Tooze

From a prizewinning economic historian, an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis (and its ten-year aftermath) as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today. In September 2008, a dramatic economic cascade of global significance spiraled around the world, from the financial markets of the US and Europe to the factories and dockyards of Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, forcing a rearrangement of global governance. It was the greatest crisis to have struck Western societies since the end of the Cold War, but was it inevitable? And is it over? Finally, Tooze asks, given this history, what now are the prospects for a stable, sustainable and coherent world order?

Cousins Maine Lobster : how one food truck became a multimillion-dollar business / Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac ; with Blake D. Dvorak ; foreword by Barbara Corcoran
The gambler : how penniless dropout Kirk Kerkorian became the greatest deal maker in capitalist history / William C. Rempel
The bonanza king : John Mackay and the battle over the greatest riches in the American West / Gregory Crouch

Cousins Maine Lobster: How One Food Truck Became a Multimillion-Dollar Business by Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac

In early 2012, Jim Tselikis visited L.A. and met up with his cousin Sabin Lomac. Over a few drinks they waxed nostalgic about their childhood in Maine, surrounded by family, often elbow deep in delicious lobster while gathered around the picnic table. From this strong memory was born the very first Cousins Maine Lobster food truck. Smart, authentic marketing, and sustainable, delicious ingredients helped turn that one food truck into an overnight sensation. Then, in just three years, they went from a single food truck to a nationally-franchised legion of trucks, an online delivery service, and a brick-and-mortar restaurant, grossing over $15 million dollars in sales a year.

Start-up fever has taken hold of America, and there are hundreds of books to teach readers how to become an entrepreneur; this is the first book to answer the question: What’s next? At each step, Jim and Sabin were faced with hard decisions—opening each new food truck carefully instead of rushing to meet the demand; turning down a six-figure franchise offer because it came from someone who didn’t support their vision; turning down “Shark Tank” (twice) until they could insist on participating only if Barbara Corcoran was one of the Sharks. Now Jim and Sabin teach readers how they, too, can reach the next level of success in their own businesses, without having to compromise themselves.

The Gambler: How Penniless Dropout Kirk Kerkorian Became the Greatest Deal Maker in Capitalist History by William C. Rempel

The rags-to-riches story of one of America’s wealthiest and least-known financial giants, self-made billionaire Kirk Kerkorian—the daring aviator, movie mogul, risk-taker, and business tycoon who transformed Las Vegas and Hollywood to become one of the leading financiers in American business. Kerkorian never put his name on a building, but when he died he owned almost every major hotel and casino in Las Vegas. He envisioned and fostered a new industry —the leisure business. Three times he built the biggest resort hotel in the world. Three times he bought and sold the fabled MGM Studios, forever changing the way Hollywood does business.

In this engrossing biography, investigative reporter William C. Rempel digs deep into Kerkorian’s long-guarded history to introduce a man of contradictions—a poorly educated genius for deal-making, an extraordinarily shy man who made the boldest of business ventures, a careful and calculating investor who was willing to bet everything on a single roll of the dice.

The Bonanza King: John Mackay and the Battle Over the Greatest Riches in the American West by Gregory Crouch

Born in 1831, John W. Mackay was a penniless Irish immigrant who went to California during the Gold Rush and mined without much luck for eight years. When he heard of riches found on the other side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1859, Mackay abandoned his claim and walked a hundred miles to the Comstock Lode in Nevada.

Over the course of the next dozen years, Mackay worked his way up from nothing, seizing control of the most concentrated cache of precious metals ever found on earth, the legendary “Big Bonanza,” a stupendously rich body of gold and silver ore discovered 1,500 feet beneath the streets of Virginia City, the ultimate Old West boomtown. But for the ore to be worth anything it had to be found, claimed, and successfully extracted, each step requiring enormous risk and the creation of an entirely new industry.

When Mackay died in 1902, front-page obituaries in Europe and the United States hailed him as one of the most admired Americans of the age. Featuring great period photographs and maps, The Bonanza King is a dazzling tour de force, a riveting history of Virginia City, Nevada, the Comstock Lode, and America itself.


Looking for your next great read?

Let us help you!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

toledolibrary.org/Give3Get!
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What to Read-Watch-Listen to Next!

Feel like there’s nothing interesting to read/watch/listen to lately? The Toledo Lucas County Public Library has offered a Give 3, Get 3 suggestion service to the public since summer of 2015. Using the form on our website, anyone can submit up to three books, movies or musicians they’ve enjoyed reading/watching/listening to and a real, live librarian will suggest three (or more!) other authors/titles, movies/television programs or tunes to try. We love a challenge and if what we initially send doesn’t resonate, you can send us additional criteria or preferences to help us refocus our efforts. Connecting readers/listeners/viewers with something they haven’t yet read/heard/seen is what we love doing most. Make our day and ask!

Here’s what is on my radar this week:

Leonardo Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Leonardo Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Likely to be the hit of the season, based on Leonardo’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, best-selling biographer Isaacson weaves a narrative that shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and a playful imagination.

Turtles All The Way Down by John Green

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

In his long-awaited return, the author of best-selling The Fault in Our Stars shares the story of sixteen-year-old Aza. She never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.

The Book of Dust La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman

The Book of Dust by Philip Pullman

Pullman returns to the parallel world of the best-selling His Dark Materials series for a thrilling parallel epic adventure.

Braving the wilderness : the quest for true belonging and the courage to stand alone / Brené Brown, PHD, LMSW

Braving the Wilderness: the Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone by Brene Brown

Popular TED-talker Brown contends that one of the major crises in today’s culture is the feeling of being disconnected, which evidences itself in unrealistic people-pleasing standards, and the erosion of civility. She has developed an enthusiastic, practical guide to achieving a healthy sense of interconnectedness within one’s culture and community.

The Last Kingdom (DVD)

The Last Kingdom: Season One

Rotten Tomatoes: 92%

This is a sleeper hit (based on a wonderful historical fiction series by Bernard Cornwell about England in the time of Alfred the Great) with wonderful characters and beautiful production values – a good match for Vikings and Game of Thrones fans.

Check out the Last Kingdom series by Bernard Cornwell (Aka: Saxon Stories, The Saxon Tales and/or Warrior Chronicles).

Book 1: The Last Kingdom

Book 2: The Pale Horseman

Book 3: The Lords of the North

Book 4: Sword Song

Book 5: The Burning Land

Book 6: Death of Kings

Book 7: The Pagan Lord

Book 8: Empty Throne

Book 9: The Warriors of the Storm

Book 10: The Flame Bearer

Originally posted at: ToledoLibrary.org/blog/what-to-read-watch-listen-to-next by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Amy H.

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Beyond the Best Sellers: Mysteries and Thrillers

Like mysteries and thrillers, but find yourself stuck in a never-ending loop of Patterson’s and Baldacci’s? Check out our list of the best mysteries and thrillers of 2017 that have flown under the “best seller” radar. Whether you like historical mysteries, psychological thrillers, or detective procedural- there is something for everyone!

Under the Radar: Mysteries and Thrillers

The Final Girls by Riley Sager
The Scarred Woman by Jussi Adler-Olsen
Murder on Black Swan Lane by Andrea Penrose
Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker
What Remains of Me by Alison Gaylin
Say Nothing by Brad Parks
The Shadow Land by Elizabeth Kostova
Everything You Want Me To Be by Mindy Mejia
Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough
Dead Letters by Caite Dolan-Leach
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