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Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Plays by African-American Playwrights

Tarell McCraney’s having a pretty good couple of years. He’s the playwright who last year won an Oscar for writing the daring screenplay for the exquisite movie Moonlight, and next year he’ll see his play Choir Boy open on Broadway.

The Brother/Sister Plays by Tarell McCraney
Choir Boy by Tarell McCraney
Moonlight DVD

He’s also part of a long tradition of African-American playwrights who have long been at the forefront of pushing the art form of the American theater into new artistic, political, and popular territory.  Whether the plays are doggedly realistic, bitingly satirical, or wildly expressionistic, the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library has on its shelves a variety of examples from this tradition that are well worth reading. A selective compendium follows.

The first African-American playwright to reach Broadway with a non-musical play was Willis Richardson with The Chip Woman’s Fortune in 1923, a play you don’t hear about too much anymore. But Lorraine Hansberry was the first African-American woman to hit Broadway (collaborating with Lloyd Richards, a black director), and the play she took there in 1959 has been enormously influential. A searing family drama about class and race and community pride, A Raisin in the Sun is a cornerstone of American literature and continues to dialogue with successive plays and writers to this day.

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry - book
A Raisin in the Sun with Sidney Poitier DVD
A Raisin in the Sun with Sean Combs - DVD

As disquieting as the economic realities exposed by Hansberry were, the naturalism and domestic setting of her play made her uncompromising vision of the world digestible to a broad audience. Just a few years later, the playwright LeRoi Jones (later Amiri Baraka) took a very different approach.  His 1964 play Dutchman is starkly allegorical and viscerally violent, following the tumultuous interaction between a white woman and a black man on a subway car.

James Baldwin, of course, is a colossal figure in American thought and literature, known primarily for his bracing prose. But he also wrote plays. Most notable is his 1964 play Blues for Mister Charlie, a history play inspired by the horrific murder of Emmett Till.

Vastly different in style is Funnyhouse of a Negro by Adrienne Kennedy, which shared the Obie award with Dutchman in 1964. Ambitious and exhilarating and occasionally exhausting, Kennedy’s play about racism and stereotypes is absurdist and dreamlike, featuring masks and hair loss and an enormous statue of Queen Victoria. Even though she emerged on the scene decades ago, Kennedy is still relevant; the University of Toledo produced Funnyhouse as recently as 2003, and her latest play He Brought Her Heart Back in a Box just opened in New York last month.

Meanwhile, Charles Gordone was the first African-American playwright to receive the Pulitzer Prize for drama, in 1970, for his play No Place to Be Somebody. Inspired by what he observed in his job as a bartender at a Greenwich Village watering hole, the play’s story of struggling urbanites chasing broken dreams seems descended from Hansberry and O’Neill, but with the sordid and flashy elements of gangsters and gunplay mixed in to goose the action.

Gordone’s play has a rough poetry to it, but for a play that takes lyricism to a whole other level check out Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow is Enuf.  Shange calls this theatrical work, a collection of twenty poetic and idiosyncratically punctuated monologues, a choreopoem, because each character’s speech – some about very difficult subjects and upsetting experiences – is composed to be paired with music and choreography.

For Colored Girls by Ntozake Shange - book
For Colored Girls by Ntozake Shange - Audiobook on CD
For Colored Girls - play on DVD

Samm-Art Williams’s 1978 play Home was originally produced by the Negro Ensemble Company and transferred to Broadway where it was nominated for a Tony.  Like some of the other plays on this list, Home – a kind of staged bildungsroman – chronicles the experiences of a character who enters an urban milieu and is buffeted by crime and economic woes and poor choices. What differentiates the play from a lot of serious issue-oriented theater is its sense of humor and its ultimately sunny outlook; this protagonist, when things are going poorly, merely hypothesizes that God must be “on vacation in Miami.”

Charles Fuller’s 1982 Pulitzer-Prize-winning A Soldier’s Play, by contrast, doesn’t have much humor, but it does do interesting things with genre, appropriating the conventions of a murder mystery to explore violent bigotry and internalized racism. With its use of flashbacks and multiple locations, Fuller’s play is thoroughly cinematic, and it made an effortless leap to the screen in a film adaptation featuring Denzel Washington.

Before George C. Wolfe became one of the most celebrated and influential theatrical directors in the country, shepherding major works by other writers like Tony Kushner to the stage and running the Public Theatre, he wrote The Colored Museum, an exuberant and bitingly satirical series of sketches best remembered for “The Last Mama-On-The-Couch Play,” an irreverent parody of A Raisin in the Sun.

There are few more towering figures in American theater than the playwright August Wilson. His ten-play oeuvre, The Pittsburgh Cycle, chronicles the twentieth-century black American experience decade by decade in plays that range from rambling kitchen-sink naturalism to magic realism while always maintaining a remarkable tonal unity. Probably the most famous of these plays is Fences, which Denzel Washington turned into an award-winning film.

Jitney by August Wilson - book
Ma Rainey's Black Bottom by August Wilson - book
Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson - book
The Piano Lesson by August Wilson - book
Two Trains Running by August Wilson - book
Seven Guitars by August Wilson - book
King Hedley II by August Wilson - book
Gem of the Ocean by August Wilson - book
Radio Golf by August Wilson - book

Encouraged in college to become a playwright by James Baldwin, Suzan-Lori Parks exploded onto the scene with early plays like The America Play, which established her as someone who writes for the stage with a grammar and orthography that are all her own. She explores about race and America and history by approximating a heightened version of Black English and telling unconventionally theatrical stories about characters with evocative names and symbolic resonance.

The Red Letter Plays by Suzan-Lori Parks - book
The Book of Grace by Suzan-Lori Parks - book
Father Comes Home From the Wars by Suzan-Lori Parks - book

With two actors playing multiple roles, Yellowman by Dael Orlandersmith explores how being dark-skinned or light-skinned influences its characters’ experiences of the pressures exerted by race and class – and shapes their relationships with one another. Orlandersmith is currently in New York performing a new play of hers, Until the Flood, about the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

Lydia Diamond often writes about affluent African-Americans, in plays that typically open with congenial interactions among friends and colleagues until conflicts over issues like race and poverty boil to the surface.  Check out her play Stick Fly.

And Passing Strange, an acclaimed musical by a playwright and performer who calls himself Stew, combines autobiography, allegorical drama and rock & roll into a highly entertaining mélange.

Yellowman by Dael Orlandersmith - book
Book / eBook
Stick Fly by Lydia Diamond - book
Passing Strange by Stew - book

One of the most significant writers in the American theater today is Lynn Nottage, a prolific and eclectic playwright who’s also the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama twice: in 2009 for Ruined, a riff on Brecht’s Mother Courage that interrogates the human capacity for resilience and compromise amidst the unrelenting brutality of wartime in Congo; and in 2017 for Sweat, a portrait of working-class malaise in the 21st-century American heartland.

Crumbs From the Table of joy by Lynn Nottage - book
Ruined by Lynn Nottage - book
By the Way, Meet Vera Stark by Lynn Nottage - book
Sweat by Lynn Nottage - book

The playwright Katori Hall has written a number of plays and won several awards, but thus far has attracted the most attention for her slyly metaphysical two-hander The Mountaintop, which imagines an interaction between Martin Luther King and a hotel housekeeper on the night before his assassination. Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett played the roles on Broadway, and the play helped initiate a conversation about theatrical representation of race when another theater produced the play with a white actor in the King role.

Thomas Bradshaw, meanwhile, is a provocateur, writing plays about violence, sexual aberrations, and racism that are designed to make the audience uncomfortable. His (possibly ironically titled) play Intimacy, about pornography, is no exception.

Katori Hall - book
Intimacy by Thomas Bradshaw - book

And then there’s one of the most striking success stories of the recent American theater, the self-made writer/director/actor Tyler Perry. He went from writing, self-producing, and starring in his own plays at community theaters to making feature films and being named the highest paid person in entertainment by Forbes magazine. But his plays are where it all began, and several are available in their theatrical form on DVD from the library, including Diary of a Mad Black Woman, The Marriage Counselor, Madea’s Big Happy Family, The Haves and the Have Nots, Neighbors From Hell, and Madea On the Run.

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Eric P. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/plays-by-african-american-playwrights.

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Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

If you’re looking for inspiration or simply tips on writing, why not learn from experienced and successful writers like Stephen King and Walter Dean Myers, after all they know their stuff! How did they become bestselling authors? What’s their secret to success?

Writers on Writing – Books

How to be a writer: conversations with writers about writing by David Quantick
On Writing: a memoir of the craft by Stephen King
Zen in the art of writing by Ray Bradbury
On Writing by Charles Bukowski
Letters to a Young Writer by Colum McCann
Just Write: Here's How by Walter Dean Myers
The Accidental Life - An Editor's Notes on Writing and Writers by Terry McDonell
Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living edited by Manjula Martin
The New York Times Footsteps : from Ferrante's Naples to Hammett's San Francisco, literary pilgrimages around the world
The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art of Storytelling by Charles Johnson
The writer who stayed / William Zinsser ; foreword by Robert Wilson
Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott
Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules of Writing
Reading like a writer : a guide for people who love books and for those who want to write them / Francine Prose
Pep Talks for Writers - 52 Insights and Actions to Boost Your Creative Mojo by Grant Faulkner
Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy: Advice and Confessions on Writing, Love, and Cannibals by Dinty W. Moore

Writers on Writing – Videos

How To Become A Published Author: Advice From Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Lee Child on Starting Writing After 40

Neil Gaiman on Writing

Alexander McCall-Smith

Isabel Wilkerson

Writing Tips from the Web

So, You Want to be a Writer? Essential Tips for Aspiring Novelists – The Guardian

33 Authors Gave Us Their Best Advice on Writing – Buzzfeed

World’s Best-Selling Author James Patterson On How To Write An Unputdownable Story – Fast Company

10 Powerful Secrets of Bestselling Authors – Write to Done

Practical Writing Tips from 65 Bestselling Authors – CreativINDIE

The 90 Top Secrets of Bestselling Authors – Writer’s Digest

Timeless Advice on Writing: The Collected Wisdom of Great Writers – Brain Pickings

Writers on Writing – NPR Playlist

Toledo Library Blog Posts on Writing

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

The Art of Storytelling: 5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

How to Write a Novel in a Month

Learn How to Publish a Book

Writer’s Block


Originally posted at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/writers-on-writing-tips-for-aspiring-authors by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S.

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The Toledo Troopers Digital Collection is Growing!

Beverly Severance, former middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers during their 1974 and 1975 seasons, recently loaned her personal collection to the Local History and Genealogy Department for digitization. The first item of her collection is a 1975 photograph of Toledo Troopers Coach Bill Stout driving a convertible with five players in an East Toledo Parade. The players include, from left to right, Pam Schwartz, Mitchi Collette, Sheila Browne, Beverly Severance and Dorothy Parma. Two of the additional items are visible in the photograph. The vintage t-shirt is nearly identical to the one she is wearing in the photo. A mini souvenir football, like the ones the players were throwing to the crowd, is another item. Her collection also includes her portrait in uniform, number 53.

Samples from Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s Toledo Troopers Online Exhibit

Photo of Beverly Severance - Toledo Troopers 1970s

Beverly Severance photograph, 1970s

This colored photograph belongs to Beverly Severance. It is her portrait taken during the time she played middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers, number 53, during the 1974 and 1975 seasons.

 

Photo of a Toledo Troopers souvenir football - 1970s

Toledo Troopers souvenir football, 1970s

This miniature, souvenir football belongs to Beverly Severance. It is yellow with green lettering, and “Toledo Troopers; League Champions, National Women’s Football” is printed on it. Footballs like this one were thrown to the crowd in the parade in which Beverly, some of her teammates, and her coach were photographed in. The footballs are also visible in the photograph that is a part of Beverly’s collection. She played middle linebacker, number 53, for the Toledo Troopers for the 1974 and 1975 seasons.

Toledo Troopers - Vintage T-Shirt 1970s

Toledo Troopers vintage t-shirt, 1970s

This vintage, Toledo Troopers t-shirt belongs to Beverly Severance. It is white with green print. Beverly played middle linebacker for the Toledo Troopers during the 1974 and 1975 seasons as number 53. The t-shirt is similar to the one in which she was photographed with her teammates and coach in a 1975 parade in East Toledo.

 


Beverly’s loan enriches the Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s digital collection that several other Toledo Troopers have also generously loaned their items to, in order to record their incredible history. They include: Guy Stout (former waterboy and son of Coach Bill Stout), and former players Mitchi Collette, Pam Hardy Fisher, Linda Jefferson, Gloria Jimenez, and Eunice White. The entire collection can be viewed at Ohio Memory.

Toledo Troopers Logo

Toledo Troopers Movie and More

If you haven’t heard of the Toledo Troopers yet, get ready to hear a lot more about them! During their nine-year existence from 1971 through 1979, they won seven national championships and held an impressive record that boasted only four games lost out of sixty-eight played. They were recognized in 1983 as the “Winningest Pro Football Team Ever” by the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Be on the lookout for …

A book by Steve Guinan, titled “Perfect Season.”

The Ohio History Connection in Columbus, Ohio, is planning an exhibit highlighting Ohio’s contributions to sports that will open on March 16, 2019, which will include the Toledo Troopers.

A documentary is also in the works, by Communica – check out the trailer.

 

Originally posted by Gayle H. on ToledoLibrary.org/blog/our-online-toledo-troopers-exhibit-is-growing

 

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Great Summer Reads at the Toledo Library!

Top Librarian Secret:

Best-sellers are SOOO overrated! There are tons of wonderful “mid-list” titles out there that are just waiting to be discovered.

Check these out for some great summer reading options:

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang
Lost Empress : A Novel by Sergio De La Pava
Dear Mrs. Bird by A.J. Pearce
The Lido by Libby Page
The Elizas : A Novel by Sara Shepard

The Kiss Quotient” by Helen Hoang

This is the perfect summer romance novel, with a sunny California setting and an awkward, tender, and utterly sweet romance between its protagonists. Autistic econometrician Stella and vivacious escort Michael are a very unlikely pair, but when she hires him to teach her how to have a relationship, they’re both astonished to develop a powerful personal connection. Michael’s gentle kindness with anxious, wary Stella will melt any reader’s heart.

Lost Empress” by Sergio De La Pava

A madcap, football-obsessed tale of crossed destinies and criminal plots gone awry, this novel cleverly weaves together a sports drama and a crime story, starring a manipulative mastermind, all told in a style that might best be described as a series of trick plays, fictional feints, and philosophical asides.

Dear Mrs. Bird” by A.J. Pearce

An irresistible debut set in London during World War II about an adventurous young woman who becomes a secret advice columnist— a warm, funny, and enormously moving story for fans of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.”

The Lido” by Libby Page

In the tradition of Fredrik Backman’s “A Man Called Ove,” “The Lido” is a charming, feel-good novel that follows two women at the opposite ends of life bonding over the closure of a beloved local pool —an irresistible tale of love, loss, aging, and friendship.

The Elizas” by Sara Shepard

Unable to convince anyone that she was pushed before she was rescued from the bottom of a hotel pool, a rising author struggling with depression and memory loss begins to question her sanity as elements from her debut novel mix up with events in her real life. By the best-selling author of “Pretty Little Liars.”


Don’t see what appeals to you here?

Try out our Give 3 Give 3 service for personalized suggestions.

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Raising Awareness: The Silent Witness Project at the Toledo Library

Domestic violence is an International epidemic

Defined as the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault and/or other abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another;  there is no corner of the world where domestic violence does not reach. Domestic violence affects individuals in every community regardless of age, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion or nationality.The devastating physical, emotional and psychological consequences of domestic violence can cross generations and last a lifetime. For women, the threat of death due to domestic violence is very real – especially when they begin to take steps to leave.

Please join the Steinem Sisters Collection at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library (TLCPL) as we honor those lost to domestic violence in the Toledo area and raise awareness of the continued fight to end domestic violence.

The Silent Witness Project

19 Year Old Victim
In 1990, the Silent Witness Initiative began with a goal to promote education through community-based exhibits in an effort to end domestic violence. It started with a small group of volunteers in one state and grew into an international movement, with projects in all 50 states and 23 countries.

The Northwest Ohio Silent Witness Project, which is housed and maintained at the Bethany House of Toledo, currently consists of over 55 Silent Witnesses whose lives were abruptly and violently ended at the hands of a husband, ex-husband, partner or stalker.

For the month of October, TLCPL’s Reynolds Corners Branch Library will be exhibiting 10 Witnesses in an effort to remember the stories and names of these women.

Library Events in 2018

The Silent Witness Project Exhibit

Oct. 1 – Nov. 2 | During Library Hours | Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Domestic Violence Information Sessions

TLCPL is also partnering with the Bethany House to offer several information sessions about domestic violence. These sessions will focus on 1 of 2 topics and will be held at several branches throughout the library system.

Recognizing Domestic Violence

Oct. 4 | 1:00 p.m. | Waterville Branch Library
Oct. 25 | 6:30 p.m. | Oregon Branch Library

Children and Domestic Violence

Oct. 10 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library
Oct. 24 | 7:00 p.m. | Maumee Branch Library

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The Steinem Sisters Collection: Feminism at Toledo Library!

An exciting new collection is available at the Toledo Library!

Introducing – The Steinem Sisters Collection:

Ms. Cover featuring Gloria Steinem

In December 2017, the Toledo Lucas County Public Library (TLCPL) began working with the Steinem’s Sisters Collective to acquire their lending library when their previous home, the People Called Women Bookstore, changed ownership. The Steinem’s Sisters Collective Lending Library was formed in 2014. It was established to honor Gloria Steinem in her hometown and fill an information and community need. The collection includes a wide variety of feminist resources designed to sustain feminist thought, values, and culture by inspiring learning, spreading knowledge, and strengthening the local feminist community.

Housed in the Humanities Department at the Main Library, The Steinem Sisters Collection celebrates the lives and achievements of women; champions their historical, cultural and political contributions; and strives to provide a welcoming space for women of all walks of life to share their truths. The types of materials we collect are first and foremost “feminist materials” – which are those materials that uphold women’s rights and interests in defining and promoting political, economic, personal, racial and social equality. In partnership with TLCPL’s institutional values, the Steinem Sisters Collection seeks to be welcoming of all the complex and diverse voices that comprise the modern feminist movement; to be innovative in the programming we provide; and collaborative with community members and local women’s organizations in order to broaden the reach of the collection.

Steinem Sisters Temporary Location At Main Library

Above all else, the Steinem Sisters Collection is meant to be useful to our community, to reflect the diverse nature of that community and the way feminism intersects with the various aspects of identity.

Please visit The Steinem Sisters Collection at its temporary location in the Humanities Department at the Main Library. The collection will be accessible by request while the
Main Library is closed for renovations and we will have a permanent and dedicated space when Main reopens in 2019!

In the meantime, please keep a look out for some exciting feminist programs we will be hosting throughout the system starting in September.

Why Feminism at the Public Library?

Feminism is cool

Feminism.

It is a simple word that can provoke a variety of passionate responses. With the introduction of the Steinem Sisters Collection at the Library, it is important that we investigate the question of why and how a public library can participate in critical librarianship in relation to housing a feminist collection and providing related programming.

I think this discussion could start with Dr. Angela Y. Davis who said:

Feminism involves so much more than gender equality and it involves so much more than gender. . . Feminism must involve a consciousness of capitalism and racism and colonialism and post-colonialists, and ability and more genders than we can even imagine and more sexualities than we ever thought we could name.

Public Libraries and professionally trained librarians are in a unique position to be engaged in our community, by creating programs, providing access to archival materials and encouraging discovery. Where Davis reminds us that many forms of feminism can give us a way to name multiple forms of oppression, feminism can also liberate us, and provoke us to imagine and name possibilities. Librarians as gatekeepers hold the key to these possibilities for every individual who walk through our library doors.

Feminism can be, and has been, defined in many ways and from all different perspectives. But when I talk about feminism, I’m talking about a lens that makes visible, and gives voice to, the unique and intersecting oppression women experience due to the dominant patriarchal culture; and thus, by naming it and making that oppression visible, feminism in a public library setting allows for the transforming of culture so that women are humanized and treated with the respect owed to all of humanity.

Upcoming Steinem Sisters Collection Programs: July-Dec. 2018

Steinem Sisters Collection Opening Celebration

July 9 | 6:00 p.m. | Main Library – Huntington Room

Talking Circle With Steinem Sisters Collective

Sep. 5 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library
Nov. 7 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library

The Silent Witness Project Exhibit

Oct. 1 – Nov. 2 | During Library Hours | Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Feminist Book Discussion

Oct. 3 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library
Dec. 5 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library

Recognizing Domestic Violence

Oct. 4 | 1:00 p.m. | Waterville Branch Library
Oct. 25 | 6:30 p.m. | Oregon Branch Library

Children and Domestic Violence

Oct. 10 | 6:30 p.m. | Reynolds Corners Branch Library
Oct. 24 | 7:00 p.m. | Maumee Branch Library

A Sampling of the Steinem Sisters Collection

My life on the road / Gloria Steinem
Eloquent rage : a black feminist discovers her superpower / Brittney Cooper
Missoula : rape and the justice system in a college town / Jon Krakauer
Reset : my fight for inclusion and lasting change / Ellen Pao
Women who run with the wolves : myths and stories of the wild woman archetype / Clarissa Pinkola Estés
Sharp : the women who made an art of having an opinion / Michelle Dean
Not that bad : dispatches from rape culture / edited by Roxane Gay
Sex object : a memoir / Jessica Valenti
First they killed my father : a daughter of Cambodia remembers / Loung Ung
A room of one's own / Virginia Woolf ; foreword by Mary Gordon
Ain't I a woman : Black women and feminism / by Bell Hooks
The essential feminist reader / edited and with an introduction by Estelle B. Freedman
When everything changed : the amazing journey of American women from 1960 to the present / Gail Collins
Geek girl rising : inside the sisterhood shaking up tech / Heather Cabot and Samantha Walravens
The Warrior queens / Antonia Fraser

Related Toledo Library Blog Posts

For the Feminist Curious: A Steinem Sisters Collection Book List

Jane Austen’s Hidden Feminism


Looking for your next great read?

Let us help you!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

toledolibrary.org/Give3Get!
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How to Write a Novel in a Month

NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month, began in 1999 and takes place each November challenging writers to complete a novel in 30 days. The novel must include at least 50,000 words, which amounts to producing about 1,667 per day for a month.

You may be wondering – Is it even possible to write a novel in 30 days? According to NaNoWriMo hundreds of novels have been traditionally published including Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and Cinder by Marissa Meyer to name a few.

NaNoWriMo Mission Statement:

We believe in the transformational power of creativity. We provide the structure, community and encouragement to help people find their voices, achieve creative goals and build new worlds—on and off the page.

While November may be months away, we hope you’ll start thinking about writing now, find inspiration, read more about NaNoWriMo, check out some of our novel writing resources and hatch a plan to make your next novel a reality.

Novel Writing Resources

 

The Complete Handbook of Novel Writing: Everything You Need to Know to Create and Sell Your Work from the Editors of Writer's Digest (3rd edition)
Bring Your Fiction to Life: Crafting Three-Dimensional Stories with Depth and Complexity by Karen S. Wiesner
Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days by Denise Jaden
Write Your Novel in a Month: How to Complete a First Draft in 30 Days and What to do Next by Jeff Gerke
Write-A-Thon: Write Your Book in 26 Days (and live to tell about it) by Rochelle Melander
The Writer's Compass: From Story Map to Finished Draft in 7 Stages by Nancy Ellen Dodd
Troubleshooting Your Novel by Steven James
How to Write a Book Proposal: The Insider's Step-by-Step Guide to Proposals that Get You Published by Jody Rein and Michael Larsen
Novel & Short Story Writer's Market
Writing Your Novel From Start to Finish: A Guidebook for the Journey by Joseph Bates

Writing Tips – Articles

How to Write the First Draft of a Novel in 30 Days – The Guardian

5 Steps to Writing a Novel in 30 Days – Grammarly

20 Ways to Write a Book in 30 Days – Inc.

30 Tips for Writing a Book in 30 Days – Writer’s Digest

Writing a Novel in a Month: Is it Possible and Should You Try? – NY Book Editors

How to Finish Writing a Novel in 30 Days – Bustle


If you enjoyed this blog post, you may also like …

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

Learn How to Publish a Book

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/how-to-write-a-novel-in-a-month

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Explore the Universe with a Telescope from the Library!

Telescope Kits

Have you heard about our telescope kits?

Interested in borrowing a telescope kit? Here are a few helpful details:

Kit Contents

Included in the telescope kit is the Orion Star Blast telescope, with a 4.5″ aperture and fast f/4 focal ratio which provides detailed views of solar system targets such as the Moon and planets. With the Orion Star Blast telescope, it’s also possible to view celestial objects like nebulas and star clusters, and the telescope can be assembled in a few minutes. This is a great compact telescope designed for beginner level astronomy enthusiasts. The kit also includes:

  • Two Explorer II 1.25″ Kellner telescope eyepieces (17mm and 6mm)
  • EZ Finder II reflex sight for easy aiming
  • Eyepiece rack
  • Collimation cap
  • Starry Night astronomy software
  • Carrying case

Reserving a Kit

Reservations can be made by contacting one of the following branch locations:

  • Kent
  • King Road
  • Oregon
  • Point Place
  • Sanger
  • Sylvania
  • West Toledo

Borrowing a Kit

  • Loanable for 7 days
  • Can be renewed twice
  • Check out with adult or juvenile library card
  • Must be checked out and returned to the same location during library hours (do not place in dropbox).

The Orion Star Blast telescope kits make it possible explore the universe from your own backyard.

The telescopes were generously donated by the Toledo Astronomical Association.

Astronomy, Stargazing and Telescopes .. Oh My!

Books for Kids
Star finder! : a step-by-step guide to the night sky / foreword by Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock ; editor, Sarah MacLeod
Night sky / Stephanie Warren Drimmer - National Geographic Kids book from 2017
Stars and galaxies / by James Buckley, Jr
Looking up! : the science of stargazing / by meteorologist Joe Rao ; illustrated by Mark Borgions
What we see in the stars : an illustrated tour of the night sky / Kelsey Oseid
Astronomy for Kids: 26 Family-friendly Activities about Stars, Planets, and Observing the World Around You by Michelle Nichols - eBook
Stargazing by Alex Kuskowski - eBook
Discovering the universe / Giles Sparrow

Books for Adults

Astronomy : a visual guide / Ian Ridpath ; additional contributors, Giles Sparrow and Carole Stott - DK book from 2018
The New Astronomy Guide: Stargazing in the Digital Age by Patrick Moore
Complete Guide to Stargazing by Robin Scagell
The Astronomy Book - contributors, David W. Hughes, Robert Dinwiddie, Penny Johnson, and Tom Jackson (DK Publishing)
The Stars: The Definitive Visual Guide to the Cosmos by Robert Dinwiddie, David W. Hughes, Geraint Jones, Ian Ridpath, Carole Stott, and Giles Sparrow; Consultant, Jacqueline Mitton (DK Publishing)
Eyes on the Sky: A Spectrum of Telescopes by Francis Graham-Smith
101 Objects to See in the Night Sky by Robin Scagell
Stargazing Basics: Getting Started in Recreational Astronomy by Paul E. Kinzer

Related Astronomy Websites

How to Enjoy Your New Telescope: Advice for Beginner Skywatchers – Space.com

How to Use A Telescope: 16 Essential Steps to Loving the Night Sky – Love the Night Sky

Seeing and Transparency Guide – The Astronomical League

Orion Star Blast Telescope Review and Summary – Astronomy.com

Orion StarBlast 4.5 Astro Reflector Telescope – Telescope.com


Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Amber B. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/explore-the-universe-with-a-telescope-kit-from-your-local-library.

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Enter Now! 2018 Ode to the Zip Code

When is a zip code more than a zip code? When it’s an Ode to the Zip Code. The third annual Ode to the Zip Code poetry contest, a partnership of The Fair Housing Center, The Arts Commission, Toledo Lucas County Public Library, and Toledo City Paper, is underway and contest entries are now being accepted online through March 7 on the Toledo City Paper website.

This is your opportunity to submit short poems inspired by your ZIP Code, where the number of words in each line of the poem is determined by the corresponding digit of the ZIP Code. Take last year’s winner, by Lydia Horvath, for example:

4 Near Detroit and Airport
3 We finally settled
6 Family of six, crowding into rentals
0 (here’s where I won’t discuss the summer we were homeless)
9 But there on Somerset, my very own pink bedroom

New to the contest this year is a youth category, so those 15 and under can submit their ode and compete for special recognition. Kids, here’s your chance to tell us all about your neighborhood!

All entries will be juried, and finalists will be invited to read their work at a special event at the Main Library.

Ode to the Zip Code
Apr. 19, 2018 | 5:30 p.m. | Main Library-McMaster Center

Winners selected from both adult and youth categories will be awarded cash prizes. Top entries will be published by Toledo City Paper.

April is Fair Housing Month and National Poetry Month. Ode to the Zip Code is a way for us to talk about our community and how it affects our experiences and opportunities. Inspiration for the contest came from the O, Miami Poetry Festival and WLRN-Miami Herald News, the originators of the “zip ode” concept.

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Jan O. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/enter-now-2018-ode-to-the-zip-code.

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