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Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Best Comics and Graphic Novels of 2018

Over the past few years the comic book industry seems to have re-entered a golden age, at least in terms of quality. There is a comic or graphic novel for almost everybody, and many of them can be found on the shelves of your local Toledo Lucas County Public Library or in one of our many digital collections, like hoopla.

If you’re just getting into reading comics, or looking to read the cream of the crop, here are some of the best new comics and graphic novels from 2018.

Notable Comics and Graphic Novels from 2018

Print / Digital

Berlin by Jason Lutes
Sabrina by Nick Drnaso
X-Men: Grand Design by Ed Piskor
Gideon Falls by Jeff Lemire
Batman: White Knight by Sean Murphy

Berlin by Jason Lutes

In this opus, Jason Lutes examines the intricacies of the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants of pre-war Berlin. He shows us their wants and desires in a way that will make you realize that when it comes down to it, people just want to live their lives in the best way possible. Their stories are timely and Lutes demonstrates artistic mastery with a clean black and white art style that engrosses readers in the massiveness of a diverse and bustling city.

Sabrina by Nick Drnaso

A woman disappears under mysterious circumstances, leading to an entanglement of characters who would have otherwise had no impact on one another.

In “Sabrina,” Nick Drnaso gives us a harrowing take on conjecture in our era of fake news. This is a personal story about how media can influence the behavior of people at an individual level. Our anxieties can become amplified and our views distorted by missing information.

X-Men: Grand Design by Ed Piskor

Ed Piskor delivers a super-sized love letter to the X-Men in “Grand Design” and “Second Genesis.” Essentially, these two volumes are a crash-course in mutant history. From Namor the Sub-Mariner to the Phoenix Force, this is a great book for newcomers and seasoned comics readers alike.

Piskor accomplishes two things with “Grand Design.” He creates an entry point to the Marvel universe, so if you’re looking for a place to start reading superhero comics, this is the perfect point of departure.

Secondly, “Grand Design” makes sense of confusing lines of comic book continuity. Piskor accomplishes this in a way that stays true to major X-Men themes of oppression, justice, and finding your place in a world that does not always embrace diversity.

Gideon Falls Vol. 1: Black Barn by Jeff Lemire, illustrated by Andrea Sorrentino

One benefit to reading comics is that you tend to get a sneak preview of what will be coming down the road as far as future TV shows are concerned. And you get just that in Jeff Lemire’s foray into horror, which is in development for a TV series.

TV is one thing, but what makes “Gideon Falls” one of the best comics of 2018? It creates a sense of unease and mystery, leaving you wanting more. It also poses a cryptic question, asking readers to ponder what exactly is the black barn, an ominous building that lingers over the multiple plot threads weaved in the series.

Most importantly, “Gideon Falls” is a horror comic that is serious without being too serious. There’s the perfect amount of fun to be had with this book, and fans of TV shows like “Lost,” “Twin Peaks,” and “Dark” will feel right at home.

Batman: White Knight by Sean Murphy

What if Batman was the villain and the Joker was Gotham’s hero? That’s the premise of Sean Murphy’s “White Knight,” a book that takes a new spin on the Dark Knight.

Of course, the story is more complicated than that, but what we get on the surface is an homage to Batman’s history – the cars, the gadgets, the movies, the comics – Murphy ties all of it together in a story that is just as exciting as any other Caped Crusader adventure. This is an instant Batman classic that is sure to be remembered for years to come.

All Summer Long by Hope Larson
Young Frances by Hartley Lin
Nancy by Olivia Jaimes
Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol

All Summer Long by Hope Larson

“All Summer Long” is the comic I wish I had when I was an eleven-year-old mired in the boredom of summer, waiting for the ice cream truck to roll through my neighborhood and for weekly runs to the video store so that I could rent a game for the Nintendo 64.

Alas, the mid-90s are two decades gone, but the riff on teen spirit is alive and well in Hope Larson’s “All Summer Long.” The book follows Bina, a pre-teen who finds herself home alone and without her best friend for most of the summer. Left to her own devices, she messes around on the guitar, discovers new music, and watches TV. But what ensues when she starts hanging out with an older girl is a heartwarming coming-of-age tale appropriate for all ages.

Young Frances by Hartley Lin

If you’re a young(ish) person trying to get by in the global economy, you’ll find a lot of familiar themes in “Young Frances” – work apathy, being late on the rent, constantly trying to figure out your professional life.

Frances, the titular character, is a clerk at a corporate law firm. She can’t sleep, but she works hard, keeps her head down, and is incredibly good at her job. The only problem is that she doesn’t quite know why she’s putting up with the long hours and office politics, especially when her friends are leading completely different lives that appear to be a bit more stress free.

“Young Frances” will speak to anybody who has had a job and felt a bit aimless in their career pursuits – which is probably all of us.

Nancy by Olivia Jaimes

This one isn’t a graphic novel, and you won’t find it on Library shelves or in one of our digital collections – you can find it online or in newspapers nationwide. However, Olivia Jaimes’ take on the comic strip “Nancy” is a revelation and any “Best of” list for 2018 would be remiss for excluding it.

Jaimes’ spin on “Nancy” is modern, hilarious, and speaks to the American pastime of staring at a screen all day. And in a not-so-strange twist, the most famous thing about the current run of “Nancy” isn’t the strip itself, but a single panel where Nancy uses a collection of millenial ephemera while saying “Sluggo is Lit.” This panel and three words have become a meme, forever (temporarily) ingrained in Internet culture.

If you really want to take a serious dive into comics, check out “How to Read Nancy” by Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden. It provides an excellent breakdown on how to read comics with the help of a single “Nancy” strip.

Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol

Every kid doesn’t fit in at some point during their childhood and almost every kid wants to go away to summer camp. “Be Prepared” combines the awkward time of pre-adolescence with the summer rite of passage that is the mosquito-laden horror of sleep-away camp.

That’s where we find the protagonist of “Be Prepared.” Vera is a 9-year-old daughter of Russian immigrants who is looking for her station in life and when the opportunity to go away to camp presents itself, she begs her mother to send her off.

This middle-grade graphic novel will be right at home with kids and adults alike who have ever felt like they didn’t quite belong.

This is part of a series of blog posts highlighting some of the Best Books of the Year.


Looking for your next great read?

LET US HELP YOU!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

TOLEDOLIBRARY.ORG/GIVE3GET!

 

Blog post originally posted by Franco V. on ToledoLibrary.org/blog/best-comics-and-graphic-novels-of-2018

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Join us for a Black History Month Concert featuring TSA, Feb. 1
Photo of retired BGSU professor Michael Peslikis

Michael Peslikis is a retired Bowling Green State University music theory professor. With over six decades of experience in the music industry, Professor Peslikis’ knowledge of music genres is quite diverse – from ragtime to blues and even polka.

The Queens, New York native grew up with a piano in his home where his Greek father would invite friends over to play music from their native locales. Thus, his love for piano was cultivated by his father’s friends which would serve him greatly in his career as a musician and educator.

After his days as a budding pianist, he would go on to attend Queens College, majoring in music. Since then he has been teaching and picking up a gig or two around the local music scene. The students at Toledo School for the Arts are very excited to be working with such an experienced and talented musician and educator.

As for the performance, look forward to hearing the debut of an original arrangement or two the professor has written just for us! Thank you, Toledo Lucas County Public Library and Professor Peslikis for collaborating with us!

Black History Month Music Celebration Concert

February 1, 2018 | 3 p.m. | Main Library

TSA - Toledo School for the Arts
TLCPL - Toledo Lucas County Public Library

If you enjoyed this blog post, you may also enjoy Arts Students Prepare for Black History Month

Originally posted at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/black-history-month-music-celebration-featuring-michael-peslikis-and-the-toledo-school-for-the-arts by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Lainie R.

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The Art of Storytelling: 5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

Are you an aspiring writer trying to get started on that next bestselling novel?

Are you an experienced writer, but need a little help creating compelling storylines or dynamic dialogue?

No matter where you’re at in the writing process your Library can help! We have a ton of great writing resources to help you from start to finish.

5 Tips on Crafting Compelling Storylines

Tip 1: Avoid Common Plot Cliches

We all know a cliche when we see it in a movie or read it in a book. It’s important to think about how cliches annoy you when you come across them, so you’ll be less likely to include them in your own work. By writing a story that only you can tell, instead of borrowing from popular formulas, it will be fairly easy to avoid common plot pitfalls.

We read so that we can be moved by a new way of looking at things. A cliche is like a coin that has been handled too much. Once language has been overly handled, it no longer leaves a clear imprint. ~ Janet Fitch

Tip 2: Generate New Story Ideas by Asking – What If?

If you’re having trouble generating new story ideas – try the what if question game. What if you lived in an alternate universe? What if you had to change occupations? What if you were alive during the early 1900s? By asking a series of what if questions with your personal experiences and interests in mind you’ll be able to ensure your stories are coming from a place of sincerity.

Alternate history fascinates me, as it fascinates all novelists, because ‘What if?’ is the big thing. ~ Kate Atkinson

Tip 3: Use the Power of Emotion

Engage readers with emotional content. Readers that feel emotionally invested in the characters or story won’t want to put the book down. After all, emotion often overrides reason in the human brain (compelling reasonable people to stay up all night reading).

A plot is nothing but a normal human situation that keeps arising again and again….normal human emotions—envy, ambition, rivalry, love, hate, greed, and so on.
~ Louis L’Amour

Tip 4: Create Characters That Resonate With Readers

It’s important for readers to feel connected to your characters. Think about what you can do to make them seem more real to the audience. Research facts, build backstories and create character profiles to ensure they are truly authentic.

As a writer, I demand the right to write any character in the world that I want to write. I demand the right to be them, I demand the right to think them and I demand the right to tell the truth as I see they are. ~ Quentin Tarantino

Tip 5: Draft Dynamic Dialogue

Effective dialogue helps to bring characters to life and advance the story. Read authors renowned for dialogue to find inspiration when writing your own.

If you are using dialogue — say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech. ~ John Steinbeck


Craft Compelling Stories With the Help of These Great Books

The Writer's Guide to Beginnings: How to Craft Story Openings That Sell by Paula Munier
The Irresistible Novel: How to Craft an Extraordinary Story that Engages Readers from Start to Finish by Jeff Gerke
Writing with Emotion, Tension, and Conflict: Techniques for Crafting an Expressive and Compelling Novel by Cheryl St. John
The Secrets of Story: Innovative Tools for Perfecting Your Fiction and Captivating Readers by Matt Bird
Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction by Jeff Vandermeer
The Emotional Craft of Fiction - How to Write the Story Beneath the Surface by Donald Maass (eBook)
Crafting Dynamic Dialogue: The Complete Guide to Speaking, Conversing, Arguing, and Thinking in Fiction from the editors of Writer's Digest; foreword by Cheryl St. John
Damn Fine Story: Mastering the Tools of a Powerful Narrative by Chuck Wendig (eBook)
The Art and Craft of Storytelling by Nancy Lamb (eBook)
Spellbinding Sentences by Barbara Baig (eBook)

Learn More About the Art of Storytelling With These Helpful Articles

Three Powerful Ways to Brainstorm New Story Ideas – Well-Storied

5 Golden Rules for Writing Authentic Dialogue – Writer’s Edit

5 Elements for Crafting a Compelling Story Your Audience Will Love – Write to Done

5 Tips For Creating Characters Readers Can’t Wait to Come Back To – The Creative Penn

5 Tips on Writing Dialogue – NY Book Editors

7 Simple Ways to Make a Good Story Great – Writer’s Digest

Ten Authors Who Write Great Dialogue – LitReactor

10 Easy Ways to Improve Your Dialogue – Write to Done

10 Tips to Avoid Cliches in Writing – Writer’s Digest

The 7 Tools of Dialogue – Writer’s Digest

Emotion vs. Feeling: How to Evoke More From Readers – Writer’s Digest

Novel Settings: 7 Tips to Get Setting Description Right – Now Novel

Some of the Greatest Writers of Dialogue (And What We Can Learn From Them) – Gizmodo

Story Plots: 7 Tips for Writing Original Stories – Now Novel

Your Novel’s First Scene: How to Start Right – Jane Friedman


Toledo Library Blog Posts on Writing

Writers on Writing: Tips for Aspiring Writers

5 Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top 5 Reasons to Join a Writing Group

Memoir Writing Resources

Developing Characters that Resonate with Readers

How to Write a Novel in a Month

Learn How to Publish a Book

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Great Summer Reads at the Toledo Library!

Top Librarian Secret:

Best-sellers are SOOO overrated! There are tons of wonderful “mid-list” titles out there that are just waiting to be discovered.

Check these out for some great summer reading options:

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang
Lost Empress : A Novel by Sergio De La Pava
Dear Mrs. Bird by A.J. Pearce
The Lido by Libby Page
The Elizas : A Novel by Sara Shepard

The Kiss Quotient” by Helen Hoang

This is the perfect summer romance novel, with a sunny California setting and an awkward, tender, and utterly sweet romance between its protagonists. Autistic econometrician Stella and vivacious escort Michael are a very unlikely pair, but when she hires him to teach her how to have a relationship, they’re both astonished to develop a powerful personal connection. Michael’s gentle kindness with anxious, wary Stella will melt any reader’s heart.

Lost Empress” by Sergio De La Pava

A madcap, football-obsessed tale of crossed destinies and criminal plots gone awry, this novel cleverly weaves together a sports drama and a crime story, starring a manipulative mastermind, all told in a style that might best be described as a series of trick plays, fictional feints, and philosophical asides.

Dear Mrs. Bird” by A.J. Pearce

An irresistible debut set in London during World War II about an adventurous young woman who becomes a secret advice columnist— a warm, funny, and enormously moving story for fans of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.”

The Lido” by Libby Page

In the tradition of Fredrik Backman’s “A Man Called Ove,” “The Lido” is a charming, feel-good novel that follows two women at the opposite ends of life bonding over the closure of a beloved local pool —an irresistible tale of love, loss, aging, and friendship.

The Elizas” by Sara Shepard

Unable to convince anyone that she was pushed before she was rescued from the bottom of a hotel pool, a rising author struggling with depression and memory loss begins to question her sanity as elements from her debut novel mix up with events in her real life. By the best-selling author of “Pretty Little Liars.”


Don’t see what appeals to you here?

Try out our Give 3 Give 3 service for personalized suggestions.

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Reading Behind the Headlines: Finding Reliable Information in the Post-Truth Era

Partner blog post by librarians Melissa J. and Teresa A.

Distinguishing Fact from Fiction

A few months ago, one of our teen customers came up to our reference desk to say hello and to tell me about a piece of concerning news she read on the internet. The teen told me she read that ICE had thrown a pregnant woman over the wall to prevent her from having a baby on U.S. soil. At first, I felt a wave of shock upon hearing this disturbing information, which was quickly followed by skepticism. I asked the teen where she had obtained this upsetting news and she informed me that she read it on Facebook. This triggered my inner librarian and I immediately turned to the computer to find the article and check its accuracy. With one keyword search on Google, I discovered the photo with the troubling headline was published on “The Onion,” a satirical newspaper. I attempted to explain to the teen that the article was satire, not real news, and we debated about how fake and photoshopped the featured photo was in reality.

This exchange is a prime example of the current issues surrounding our ability, and often inability, to distinguish between real, false or misleading information. While we would like to believe that this is only a problem amongst our teens, we know that even adults can struggle to make this distinction as misleading information has become more sophisticated and purposefully harder to identify. Finding reliable and relevant information from credible sources is a basic building block for being an informed citizen. Yet, the ability to distinguish between credible and misleading information requires an acute attention to detail. To be sure, the devil is in the details.

Consider the following web addresses:

www.whitehouse.gov

www.whitehouse.com

www.whitehouse.org

Whitehouse.gov is the official government website for information about the White House and the current administration. Whitehouse.com is a website with a controversial history of featuring adult content (“SITES WE hate,” 2002). It currently features short political news stories and surveys. Finally, whitehouse.org is a parody website. While these websites appear to be very similar, the content they feature is very different. It is easy to see that the slightest variation, which to many people may appear to be an unimportant difference, has a significant impact on the actual content. In many cases, details are key to understanding “where” you are on the internet and, in turn, in distinguishing the credibility of a particular web address. Most web addresses ending in “.com” are related to commercial businesses, web addresses ending in “.gov” are government websites, and those ending in “.org” are generally related to non-profit organizations. Simply knowing these small details about a web address can help lead you to credible and reliable information.

This is true too, when it comes to understanding information. It is important to recognize the origins of the information that is being conveyed. For example, let’s review the misinformation provided by the teen. She believed the article was real because she failed to identify is origins. If she had, she would have realized that the article was meant to be humorous because it was derived from a satirical newspaper. Acknowledging the distinction is very important.

The best advice we can provide is to be skeptical of information obtained online and do additional research. Through our library website customers have access to numerous educational and scholarly resources, many of which, can be accessed from your home computer with internet access, a library card, and pin number. Also, included below are links to various fact-checking websites and additional reading recommendations concerning current information issues. Another option is to ask your local librarian and let them do the work for you. Finally, we encourage you to join us for a special event:

Reading Behind the Headlines: Finding Reliable Information in the Post-Truth Era

September 4, 2018 | 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. | Kent Branch Library

Hear local media specialists discuss the work that goes behind publishing the news and learn about resources you can use to evaluate sources and find reliable information.

This program seeks to help attendees distinguish between credible and unreliable news sources. During the program, attendees will hear from local media specialists who will discuss the work that goes on behind publishing the news. We will also discuss how you can use library resources to evaluate sources and find reliable information.

Blog Post Citations

University of Michigan to Help Citizens Spot Fake News – Michigan Radio (written by Tracy Samilton, published on April 18, 2017)

ICE Agents Hurl Pregnant Immigrant Over Mexican Border to Prevent Birth on U.S. Soil – The Onion (published January 18, 2018)

Did ICE Hurl a Pregnant Woman Over a Border Wall? – Snopes.com (written by Kim LaCapria, published on June 26, 2018)

SITES WE hate – Yahoo! Internet Life (published May 2002, vol. 8, issue 5, page 66)

Fact Checking: Internet Resources

  • Whois.com: Use this website to identify who owns a particular website
  • Allsides.com: Compare how news outlets cover the same topic
  • Opensecrets.org: Track campaign contributions on this nonpartisan website
  • Factcheck.org: Fact check popular stories in the news and on social media
  • Politifact.com: Ranks the truthfulness of claims and statements made by politicians and provides explanations for their ranking
  • Snopes.com: Fact checking news stories
  • Blue Feed, Red Feed: See how different your Facebook Newsfeed can look based on your political leanings
  • Media Bias Fact Check: Explore this site to find out about the bias of the information sources you access.

Additional Reading Recommendations

Related Library Books

Overload : finding the truth in today's deluge of news / Bob Schieffer with H. Andrew Schwartz
Finding Reliable Information Online: Adventures of an Information Sleuth by Leslie F. Stebbins
Research Strategies: Finding your way through the information fog by William Badke
Smart Online Searching: Doing Digital Research by Mary Lindeen

Looking for your next great read?

Let us help you!

Tell us what you’ve enjoyed reading, watching or listening to, and our librarians will give you personalized recommendations.

No algorithms, cookies or data mining – just real experts in your community sharing their love of great books, music and movies with you. We call it Give 3 Get 3.

Get started today at

toledolibrary.org/Give3Get!
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National Day of Listening

Everyone has a story to tell and everyone deserves to be heard. People feel appreciated, understood, and even loved when someone takes the time to really listen to them.

Lately, I’ve been reading articles and watching videos about how we’re all so connected yet less happy. I know just thinking about it is a bit of a downer, but really it’s an interesting topic and one that deserves more attention. In the age of social media we’re sharing more, but connecting less. What’s wrong with this picture? After all, how can you share more and yet still feel disconnected? So, ask yourself this: when was the last time you had a real conversation with someone and truly listened to the other person? By truly listening, I mean you weren’t just waiting for your turn to speak.

What is the National Day of Listening?

Launched in 2008 by StoryCorps, the National Day of Listening takes place every year the day after Thanksgiving. The project encourages people to sit down with a loved one and record a meaningful conversation.

An Intro to StoryCorps from our Founder Dave Isay


Let the library help you celebrate the National Day of Listening

Record Your Story

Storycorps launched the National Day of Listening as a way to encourage families to set aside the day after Thanksgiving as a time to share and record the history of their family, friends, and community.

Visit StoryCorps.org for a DIY guide and to upload your recording to Storycorps’ Wall of Listening. #NationalDayofListening

Use the Library’s recording studio to capture your interview on our equipment or use your phone in our acoustically ready space. Call the West Toledo Branch at 419-259-5290 or the King Road Branch at 419-259-5380 to learn more about our studio spaces.

Check out the Adrene Cole Collection

The African American Oral History Collection of Lucas County connects people and generations by preserving and sharing local voices and perspectives for future generations.

Claude Black | Adrene Cole Collection – Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Check out Sight and Sound

Join host Tom Walton as he interviews Toledo’s top public figures; celebrating their unique impact on Toledo history.

Sam Szor | Sight & Sound – Toledo Lucas County Public Library

Videos by StoryCorps

Two very curious brothers ask their dad some outlandish questions
Two nurse practitioners talk about treating infants exposed to opioids
Brian talks to Matt, who has been living on the streets, about the day they met
Ronald Clark remembers living inside a branch of the New York Public Library
The Bookmobile

Books by StoryCorps

Listening is an act of love : a celebration of American life from the StoryCorps Project / edited and with an introduction by Dave Isay
Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps by Dave Isay
Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps - edited by Dave Isay
StoryCorps OutLoud: Stories from the LGBTQ community, gathered by StoryCorps and heard on NPR - hosted by Ari Shapiro, featuring Dave Isay
All There Is: Love Stories from StoryCorps edited by Dave Isay

Ted Talks about technology, listening, and conversation

Connected, but alone? | Sherry Turkle – Ted Talks
 

The Power of deliberate listening | Ronnie Polaneczky – TEDxPhiladelphia

 

10 Ways to have a better conversation | Celeste Headlee – Ted Talks

Books about conversation and listening

The lost art of good conversation : a mindful way to connect with others and enrich everyday life / Sakyong Mipham
The Lost Art of Listening: How Learning to Listen Can Improve Relationships by Michael P. Nichols, PhD
Reclaiming conversation : the power of talk in a digital age / Sherry Turkle
We need to talk : how to have conversations that matter / Celeste Headlee

Articles about conversation and listening

The Lost Art of ConversationUSA Today

Is Conversation a Lost Art? – Wonderopolis

Saving the Lost Art of ConversationThe Atlantic

10 Tips to Talk About Anything with AnyonePsychology Today

The Art and Value of Good ListeningPsychology Today

Active Listening: Hear What People are Actually Saying – Mind Tools


Featured Image Credit: Conversation at the ‘IJ’ lake, Amsterdam by Thijs Paanakker (flickr)

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger April S. at http://www.toledolibrary.org/blog/national-day-of-listening.

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Halloween Costumes, Crafts, Cookies & More!

We have many titles with oodles of great ideas for a spookily festive holiday. Everything from creating your own unique costume to creative holiday treats. Get creative and have fun with the help of your local library!

Costumes

1000 incredible costume & cosplay ideas : a showcase of creative characters from anime, manga, video games, movies, comics, and more! / Yaya Han, Allison DeBlasio & Joey Marsocci a.k.a. Dr. Grymm

1000 Incredible Costume & Cosplay Ideas: A Showcase of Creative Characters from Anime, Manga, Video Games, Movies, Comics and More by Yaya Han, Allison DeBlasio, and Joey Marsocci (a.k.a. Dr. Grymm)

Provides a broad and detailed glimpse into the ingenious artistry and attention to detail behind some of the most fabulous costumes you can find.

 

Duct tape costumes / by Carolyn Bernhardt

Duct Tape Costumes by Carolyn Bernhardt

Easy to follow step-by-step guide on creating costumes using duct tape.

 

The hero's closet : sewing for cosplay and costuming / Gillian Conahan

The Hero’s Closet: Sewing for Cosplay and Costuming by Gillian Conahan

A skilled crafter and avid cosplayer presents a DIY guide to creating unique and fantastical homemade costumes that provides an abundance of inspiration, technical tips and advice on pattern selection, alterations, fabrics and more for creating an awesome costume.

 

Crafts

Glitterville's handmade Halloween : a glittered guide for whimsical crafting / Stephen Brown

Glitterville’s Handmade Halloween by Stephen Brown

Celebrate the season of costumes and candy with Glitterville’s guide to creating a wondrously wacky and whimsical holiday! This title is also available as an eBook.

Treats

Halloween treats : simply spooky recipes for ghoulish sweet treats / with recipes by Annie Rigg

Halloween Treats: Simply Spooky Recipes for Ghoulish Sweet Treats with recipes by Annie Rigg

There’s nothing more exciting for them than hosting their own Halloween party, complete with ghoulish sweet treats. In this spooky new book, queen of cakes, Annie Rigg, turns her hand to simple, cute and creepy cakes, cookies and other edible sweet treats to delight any Halloween-loving child.

 

If you’re looking for more great books on the topics featured in this blog post, search the library catalog using the following keywords:

  • Halloween cooking
  • Halloween costumes
  • Halloween decorations
  • Handicraft
  • Holiday cooking
  • Holiday crafts
  • Cosplay
  • Costume design
  • Sewing

Originally posted by Toledo Lucas County Public Library blogger Amy H. at ToledoLibrary.org/blog/just-in-time-for-halloween-costumes-cosplay-crafts-and-cookies.

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Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

Ever wonder about your ancestors from Ireland, when they came here, if they came here and what they did when they got here?

Paul Milner has your answers.

Paul Milner is a professional genealogist and internationally known lecturer with 30 years’ experience, specializing in British Isles research.

 

This internationally known professional genealogist is coming to the Toledo Lucas County Public Library to help answer these and other questions regarding Irish Genealogy. Mr. Milner is a native of northern England and has been designing genealogy workshops, writing books, and lecturing for more than 35 years. He is the 2018 recipient of the Utah Genealocial Society Fellow Award.

Event Information

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018 | 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Maumee Branch Library
This is an all-day free event with a lunch break. Feel free to bring a lunch or dine at one of the nearby restaurants in Maumee.

Program highlights include:

  • An overview of the research process
  • Exploring land records to delve deeper
  • Using maps as a tool

In the meantime, why not pick up one (or more) of these books on Irish genealogy …

Irish Genealogy Guidebooks

The Family Tree Irish genealogy guide : how to trace your ancestors in Ireland / Claire Santry
Tracing your Irish ancestors : the complete guide / John Grenham
Tracing your Irish & British roots / W. Daniel Quillen
A Genealogist's Guide To Discovering Your Irish Ancestors by Dwight A. Radford, Kyle J. Betit

Or visit these websites …

Online Resources for Tracing Your Irish Roots

Irish Genealogy.ie

Irish Genealogy Toolkit

FamilySearch


For more information, or to register for this event, call the Local History and Genealogy Department at 419-259-5233.

Originally posted by Jill C. at ToledoLibrary.org/Tracing-Your-Irish-Ancestors

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The ABCs of DNA: An Introduction to Genetic Genealogy

Please join the Toledo Lucas County Public Library’s celebration of Immigrant Heritage Month!

Debra Smith Renard - founder of Eureka! Genealogy

 

Debra Smith Renard, founder of Eureka! Genealogy, will be presenting:

The ABCs of DNA: An Introduction to Genetic Genealogy
Saturday, June 9, 2018 | 10:00 am.

Debra is a full-time Genetic Genealogist with Legacy Tree Genealogists. She is co-leader of the Louisville, Kentucky, Genetic Genealogy Special Interest Group, a board member of the Louisville Genealogical Society and is Secretary of the Kentucky Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists. She speaks at local, regional and national levels. She is especially passionate about helping those with unknown birth families find their roots.

Her program is an overview of the genetic tests available to build family histories. Topics include:

  • Basic DNA terminology and concepts
  • The kinds of DNA tests available for genealogical purposes
  • Inheritance patterns and limitations
  • What results look like

What is Genetic Genealogy?

Genetic genealogy is the use of DNA testing, along with the use of traditional genealogical and historical records. It can be used to infer the level and type of genetic relationship between individuals.

Learn more about Genetic Genealogy:

International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG)

7 Resources to Get You Started With Genetic Genealogy

Learn more about Genetics, DNA and Genealogy

The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy by Blaine T. Bettinger
DNA : the story of the genetic revolution by James D. Watson, with Andrew Berry and Kevin Davies
Finding family : my search for roots and the secrets in my DNA by Richard Hill

Learn more about tracing your roots

It's all relative : adventures up and down the world's family tree by A.J. Jacobs
It’s All Relative: Adventures Up and Down the World’s Family Tree” by A.J. Jacobs

Traces the author’s three-year investigation into what constitutes family, describing how, after receiving an e-mail from a stranger who claimed to be a distant cousin, he embarked on an effort to build the biggest family tree in history.

Also available in Audiobook.

Finding Your Roots: The Official Companion to the PBS Series” by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Gates provides practical information for amateur genealogists just beginning archival research on their own families’ roots, and he details the advances in genetic research now available to the public.

Finding your roots : the official companion to the PBS series / Henry Louis Gates Jr. ; foreword by David Altshuler
Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. - season 4 of the PBS series on DVD
 

“Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.”

The PBS series moves from Asia and Africa to Europe and the Americas, uniting us all through emotional moments that enrich and enlighten – encouraging us to look at our world through a wider, more inclusive lens.

Seasons: One | TwoThree | Four

Check out our previous post on Genealogy Research:

Getting Started With Genealogy Research

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