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13 Fun and Entertaining Picture Books Your Preschooler Will Adore
Picture Book Month - A Celebration!

Did you know November is Picture Book Month?

Picture Book Month is an international literacy initiative that celebrates the print picture book during the month of November. Join the celebration by reading a variety of picture books to the children in your life. Encourage a love of reading and support early literacy in the process.


November is Picture Book Month | What is a Picture Book? by Katie Davis – YouTube


If you’re looking for some great books to read to your child, check out the books below. Some of them (not all) are from our 101 Picture Book Challenge, which is designed to provide all children with a strong foundation of words, reading and stories to build literacy. We picked 101 of our favorite picture books and we want you to read them, too. Our list includes classics, new titles and everything in between.

Fun Picture Books to Read to Your Preschooler

These fun and entertaining picture books will definitely induce giggles in your preschooler. And don’t be surprised if they ask you to read them multiple times.

Frog on a log? / Kes Gray and Jim Field
I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont
If you're groovy and you know it, hug a friend! / story and performance by Eric Litwin ; illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld
Rhyming dust bunnies / [text and illustrations by Jan Thomas]

1. Frog on a Log? by Kes Gray and Jim Field

In rhyming text, cat explains why frog has to sit on a log, even if he finds it uncomfortable.

2. I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont

In the rhythm of a familiar folk song, a child cannot resist adding one more dab of paint in surprising places.

3. If You’re Groovy and You Know It, Hug a Friend! by Eric Litwin

Set to the rhythm of the classic children’s song, Groovy Joe invites the reader to laugh, sing, explore, and best of all, hug a friend.

4. Rhyming Dust Bunnies by Jan Thomas

As three dust bunnies, Ed, Ned, and Ted, are demonstrating how much they love to rhyme, a fourth, Bob, is trying to warn them of approaching danger.

Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? by Dr. Seuss
Me and Annie McPhee by Oliver Dunrea
Nothing rhymes with orange / Adam Rex
Billy Bloo is stuck in goo / by Jennifer Hamburg ; illustrated by Ross Burach

5. Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? by Dr. Seuss

Kids will love this noise-filled classic from the one and only Dr. Seuss! Mr. Brown is a sound-making wonder! Encouraging imaginative play while learning to read, “Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?” will keep kids laughing. Combining brief and funny stories, easy words, catchy rhythm, and lively illustrations, Bright and Early Books are an ideal way to introduce the joys of reading to children.

6. Me and Annie McPhee by Olivier Dunrea

In this cumulative rhyme, a tiny island in the middle of the sea “just big enough for me and Annie McPhee,” rapidly becomes very crowded with increasingly larger groups of animals.

7. Nothing Rhymes with Orange by Adam Rex

All the fruits gather together and enjoy a rhyming party, but poor Orange feels left out because he does not rhyme with anything–until Apple invents a new word.

8. Billy Bloo is Stuck in Goo by Jennifer Hamburg

Told in rhyme, a parade of characters tries to help Billy Bloo free himself from the goo, but only manages to get trapped in the goo instead.

Pigs by Robert Munsch
Be Quiet! by Ryan T. Higgins
Ah-Choo! by Lana Wayne Koehler & Gloria G. Adams ; illustrations by Ken Min
The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak
Rhyme crime / John Burgerman

9. Pigs by Robert Munsch

Megan is told to feed the pigs, but not to open the gate. She does of course, and the results are hilarious as the pigs help themselves to coffee and the newspaper at the breakfast table, follow Megan to school, and ride home by way of the school bus. The Overdrive Read version is especially entertaining.

10. Be Quiet! by Ryan T. Higgins

Rupert the mouse wants to star in an artistic, wordless picture book, but his animal friends cause problems by talking too much.

11. Ah-Choo! by Lana Wayne Koehler & Gloria G. Adams

When a young boy decides to get a pet, he discovers it’s not as simple as ABC. Every animal he brings home makes his poor sister sneeze! Follow along on a funny, furry adventure that features animals of every size and stripe, from Antelopes and Bobolinks to Yaffles and Zebras!

12. The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak

The Emmy Award-winning actor best known for his performances in The Office presents a silly read-aloud book that combines a deliberately image-free format with wacky nonsense text, goofy song lyrics and more. The Overdrive Read version is fun for all ages.

13. Rhyme Crime by Jon Burgerman

A thief wreaks havoc by switching things out for rhyming counterparts, until he’s stumped by an unrhymable word.

Resources for Parents, Teachers and Caregivers of Young Children

Ready to Read – TLCPL

Why Picture Books Are Important by Mo Willems

Picture Book Month – National Education Association (NEA)

14 Laugh-Out-Loud Picture Books for Little Kids by Iva-Marie Palmer – Brightly

The 50 Best Books For Preschoolers – Early Childhood Education Zone

Reading Tips for Parents of Preschoolers by Reading Rockets

 

Originally posted by April S. on ToledoLibrary.org/blog/13-fun-and-entertaining-picture-books-your-preschooler-will-adore

 

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Good Day, Good Reads

The most jarring thing about “A Good Day,” by Kevin Henkes, is the first page, the way it begins:

“It was a bad day…”

Kind of seems like false advertising, yeah? I mean, look at the title. The title, Henkes! There were promises made!

But indeed, the first half of the book is all about characters having a real bummer of a day.

A Good Day by Kevin Henkes

But then…

Things get better. And by the end, the way they get better intersects unexpectedly with the events of the first half of the book, an elegant overlap that may satisfy fans of “This is Us” or, depending on your tastes, “Pulp Fiction.”

The plot’s overall simplicity is part of the book’s genius. Things were bad, things got better. Meaning what? Things aren’t as bad as you think they are? You should sit tight and wait for improvements to happen? Life is an unpredictable mosaic of suffering and joy? The fact that Henkes doesn’t tell you what it’s all supposed to mean is another part of the book’s genius.

Which is no surprise: writer/illustrator Henkes has a history of folding complicated emotions into deceptively simple narrative packages.

Picture Books by Kevin Henkes

Kitten's First Full Moon by Kevin henkes
Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes
Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
Wemberly Worried by Kevin Henkes
Old Bear by Kevin Henkes
Egg by Kevin Henkes
My Garden by Kevin Henkes
A Parade of Elephants by Kevin Henkes

Above all, “A Good Day” is not so much about luck or fate or fairness – it’s about feelings. Often feelings are directly influenced by outside circumstances, and sometimes you can control the impact of outside circumstances by managing your reaction to them, but the fact remains that sometimes you’re the little yellow bird who lost his tail feather, and sometimes you’re the little brown squirrel who found the biggest nut ever, and either way, there are going to be feels.

And one of the biggest challenges about being human, at least for those of us who are somewhere roughly between the ages of 2 and 115, is confronting and controlling and understanding our feelings.  Good thing there are picture books to help us with that.

Picture Books About Feelings

I Hate Everyone by Naomi Danis
Are You Scared Darth Vader by Adam Rex
I'm Sad by Michael Ian Black
Penguin Problems by Jory John
Grumpy Monkey by Suzanne Lang
The Bad Mood and the Stick by Lemony Snicket
I Love You Like a Pig by Mac Barnett
Mr Particular by Jason Kirchner
Bug in a Vacuum by Melanie Watt
Now by Antoinette Portis
The Heart and the Bottle by Oliver Jeffers
Grump Groan Growl by bell hooks
Crankenstein by Samantha Berger
My Friend is Sad by Mo Willems
Grumpy Gloria by Anna Dewdney

What is the 101 Picture Book Challenge and How Do You Take It?

The 101 Picture Book Challenge is for anyone at any age. Librarians hand picked the titles on the list which includes classics, new titles and everything in between.

To get started, register online. You can track your progress online or if you prefer a paper log booklet, pick one up at your neighborhood Library. The books are organized into categories but you can read the books in any order and at your own pace. When you read all 101 titles, you earn a free picture book (while supplies last).

This is the latest in a series of blog posts exploring some of the things we love about these books.

Originally posted by Eric P. at ToledoLibrary.org/Good-Day-Good-Reads

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